Skip to main content

Full text of "KPFA Folio"

See other formats




liti 



k&$0 





PROTEST 
EITHER 




^IfeViOlPKTfWlAToN 



Name 

Street Addr. 
City 



Zip. 



Number of sets wanted __ 

[ ] Mail them [ ] Will pick up 



A portfolio of peace posters 
coming out of the anti-war 
demonstrations last May is now 
available from KPFA. 

The portfolio consists of a dozen 
posters: 10 inside and 2 comprising the 
front and back covers respectively. 
Seven have been reproduced here. Most 
are one color printed on a smooth 
heavy white paper. They measure 19 
inches by \2 l A inches. 

The portfolios make excellent 
gifts. We will send them to 

you or you may pick them up at 
KPFA. If you pick them up in person 
you save the postage. 





ilCTCS 



>• 



l^ppA FM94 

1VI JL JL V FEBRUARY 1971 



KPFA STAFF 

Station Manager 

Al Silbowitz 

Administrative Assistant 

Pat Abramovitz 

Assistant Manager 

Elsa Knight Thompson 

Promotion Director 

Tom Green 

FOLIO Editor 

Laurel Coke 

Supervising Bookkeeper 

Mary Roman 

Bookkeeper 

Marion Jansen 

Subscription Registrar 

Marsha Bartlett 

Public Affairs Director 

Bill Northwood 

News Director 

Joe Belden 

Traffic Clerk 

Janice Legnitto 

Director of Drama & Literature 

Bob Sitton 

Drama & Literature Program 

Producer 
Eleanor Sully 
Music Director 
Charles Amirkhanian 
Music Assistant 
Warren Van Orden 
Music Program Producer 
George Cleve 
Public Affairs Program 
Producer 

Denny Smithson 
Program Secretary 

Lois Hansen 
Production Director 

Claude Marks 

Production Assistants 

Alan Farley 

Bob Bergstresser 

Paul Fagan 

Development Director 

Rena Varon Down 

Chief Engineer 

George Craig 

Engineers 

Steve Hawes 

Wayne Wagner 

Don Kaufman 

Receptionist 

Katie Markham 



CONTENTS 



COVER: William S. Hart, star of 

"Hell's Hinges," a Pacifica 
Film Festival selection. 



Manager's Report 2 

"What, Another Film 

Festival?" 

Bob Sitton 4 

Restaurant Review 

Michael & Carol 

Barclay 6 

Muse Aghast 

Charles Amirkhanian 7 
Media Monitor 

Alan Farley 7 

Address by Richard Salant 8 
Opera Plot Summary 10 

Commentators 1 1 

Program Highlights 12 

Program Listings 14 

Classified Ads 42 

"Banquet Bed" - poem 

Wade Stevenson 44 



KPFA VOLUNTEERS 

Hanna Pitkin, News 
Herb Childs, Subscription 
Terry Clarke, D & L 
Bob Douthitt, Computer 
Consultant 
Jim Emdy , Production 
Richard Friedman, Music 
Marion Wylie, Reception 
Bob Steiner, Calligrapher 
Candy Brown, Subscription 
Stan Axelrod, Operations 
John Maple, D& L 
Kathy Kahn, Development 
Patti Bittenbender, Operations 
Don Barki, Public Affairs 
Portia Shapiro, Public Affairs 
Paul Rude, News 
Bob Morris, Public Affairs 
Alan Sherr, News 
Joan Churton, Public Affairs 
Andria Sagebiel, Reception 

Copyright 

1971 Pacifica Foundation 

All rights reserved. 

The KPFA Folio 
February 1971 
Vol. 22, No. 2 

Your KPFA Folio can be 
re-cycled with your news- 
papers by removing the 
two center staples. 



KPFA KPFB 

94.1 FM 89.3 FM 

2207 Shattuck Avenue 
Berkeley, California 94704 
Telephone (415) 848-6767 



The KPFA Folio is not sold, it is sent 
free to each subscriber to the station. 
The Folio is published monthly as a 
service to subscribers who support our 
nonprofit, noncommercial station at 
the annual rate of $24.00 (student and 
retired persons annual subscription 
rate $12.00 per year). Subscriptions 
and donations arp tax deductible. 
KPFA is jn the 50% tax deduction 
category. 

KPFA broadcasts daily until well past 
midnight, beginning on weekdays at 
7:00 AM and on weekends at 8:00 
AM. KPFA broadcasts with a power 
of 59,000 watts at 94.1 MHz. KPFB 
broadcasts simultaneously with KPFA 
at a power of 150 watts at 89.3 MHz 
to areas of Berkeley which do not 
receive KPFA. 

KPFA is owned and operated by 
Pacifica Foundation. Pacifica Founda- 
tion also owns apd operates WBAI in 
New York, KPFK in Los Angeles, and 
KPFT in Houston. Pacifica Foundation 
was established in 1946 and, is incor- 
porated under the laws of California. 



REPORT FROM 
the MANAGER 




In last month's Folio, I 
discussed several aspects of 
commercial broadcasting. 
In particular the way in 
which economic pressures 
force commerical program- 
ming into a sales role, 
making programs simply 
colorful, enticing vehicles 
for commercial products. 
At this point, I'd like to 
discuss non-commercial or educational broad- 
casting. 

Non-commercial broadcasting is, indeed, very 
different from its commercial relative. Unfor- 
tunately, all too often, it is boring as well. 

When the FCC first began to regulate the 
broadcast field, it happened upon the very 
handy device of establishing a reserved portion 
of the frequency band for educational and non- 
commercial use. An educational ghetto, as it 
were. The AM frequencies were far too valuable 
and sought after for this purpose, but FM 
proved to be sufficiently vacant and experi- 
mental so that part of it might be held in 
reserve. Non-commercial broadcasters could still 
purchase or apply for licenses elsewhere, but 
market pressures soon made this extremely 
costly, especially on AM radio. 

In fact, KPFA itself broadcasts on the non- 
reserved portion of the FM band, but Pacifica 
obtained this frequency back in the late forties 
when FM was still considered a poor commercial 
bet. Were we to seek the same frequency today, 
it would have to be bought (since there are no 
vacancies in this area) and the price might well 
be over $500,000. WBAI, which also operates 
on a non-reserved frequency, was given to 
Pacifica. Its price tag now would probably 
exceed $1,000,000. 

I point all of this out simply to explain some 
of the literal and figurative "distance" which 
exists between educational broadcasters and the 
mass market. Educational broadcasters were 
made to live on a small reservation, in an area 
little trafficked by the general population, and 
far from the pressures (and advantages) of the 
monied crowd. For the most part, their opera- 
tions were conducted by academics or academi- 
cally oriented persons, since most such stations 
were owned by colleges, universities, or similar 
governmental entities. Like the Native American, 
the educational broadcaster, away from the 
mainstream of society, gave up trying to have 
any effect upon it and turned inward. The 
result was a self-defeating monologue with a 
compensating shield of injured pride and in- 



difference — certainly, little or no dialogue with 
the outside society took place. 

The founders of Pacifica chose a different 
route. They wished to be very much engaged 
with the issues of the day. Instead of institution- 
al subsidy, they turned to the public for thier 
support. This meant from the start, that they 
would have to compete directly with the other 
media for operating funds. Pacif ica's connection 
with its audience would be immediate and 
direct. In this, Pacifica was an important depart- 
ure from the rule in educational broadcasting. 
It became part of the marketplace when it 
pioneered voluntary listener support in broad- 
casting and independence in programming in 
this country. 

However, Pacifica retained many of the 
characteristics of the educational broadcaster. 
It was revolted by commercialism. It was 
satisfied with relatively small audiences. It was 
not afriad of "culture." It did not place much 
emphasis on professionalism. And it made the 
audience work to enjoy the programming. 

Very slowly, Pacifica grew, until now it 
represents, collectively, the strongest indepen- 
dent voice in educational radio broadcasting and, 
some would argue, the only really independent 
voice in American broadcasting. 

[Continued on p. 46] 

BOBSITTON 

Bob Sitton, Director 
of Drama and Litera- 
ture and the Pacifica 
Film Festival, came 
to California from 
North Carolina by 
way of New York. 
He received a Ph. D. 
I in Philosophy from 
Duke University in 
1964, and taught at 
The University of 
North Carolina, the 
New School for Social Research as well as 
Brooklyn College. He was active in the civil 
rights movement in the South and in 1965 
mounted a successful challenge to the New 
York state loyalty oath requirement for teach- 
ers. He joined the cultural news staff of the 
New York Times in 1965 as critic of television 
movies. He directed the Special Events division 
of the 6th and 7th New York Film Festivals 
and the Lincoln Center Film Education Program 
until contracting with Simon & Schuster to do a 
book on the films of the Maysles Brothers. He 
has contributed articles to the Village Voice, 
Film Comment, Film Library Quarterly and 
other publications, and is the author of two 
booklets on the American Film Institute. His 
interview series "The Movies" has run on 
Pacifica Radio for the past five years. 




KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 







*# m. Rudolph Valentino and Ellen Terry in "The Conquering Power" 

, ♦ at the Pacifica Film Festival. February 25 



KPF/1 ISADORA THAN JUST fl FILM FESTIVAL 



We're a radio station, too. Listener-supported, non-commercial. 
Covering the arts, music, and the changing scene. Free radio. 

But to be free, we need your help. 

Each subscription to KPFA brings you 12 issues of our program 
guide. It lists the variety of programs we present. 

If you're not already a subscriber, won't you join us now? 



Name 



Address 



City 



Zip 



Student/Retired/ 
Unemployed 

Regular 

Family 

1666-Club membership 

Sustaining 



] $12 for 1 yr 

] $6 for 6 mos 

] $24 for 1 yr 

] $12 for 6 mos 

] $36 for 1 yr 

] $5/moior 1 yr 

] $100 

KPFA ■ 2207 Shattuck Avenue ■ Berkeley 94704 



WHAT. ANOTHER FILM FESTIVAL? 



By BOB SITTON 




Top Hat 

After the San Francisco Film Festival and the 
Erotic Film Festival and the Berkeley Film 
Festival and the Foothill Film Festival, do we 
need another film festival? The answer, believe it 
or not, is yes. Not the usual kind offered, but 
something different. A festival that is not quite 
a festival and not quite a repertory film series. 
One that laughs at itself and above all gives us a 
chance to enjoy the delightfully varied art of 
film. Something like — the Pacifica Film Festival. 

For twenty weeks, at the M.H. de Young 
Museum in Golden Gate Park, every Thursday 
evening from February 1 1 to the end of June, 
KPFA, the Patrons of Art and Music and the 
M.H. de Young Museum Society will present a 
festival of films both new and old — comedies, 
dramas, rediscoveries believed lost for years, 
films by poor people and independent film- 
makers, classics of the cinema and some films 
never before shown on the West Coast. The 
showings are a benefit for KPFA and are open at 
a reduced cost to KPFA and de Young Museum 
subscribers. A membership card is enclosed with 
this Folio. 

Given that we need a film festival, what are 
we going to see? A lot. The West Coast premiere 
of a classic anti-war film made in Hitler's 
Germany, confiscated by the Nazis and found 
recently in Italy. The second showing since its 
original release of one of Rudolph Valentino's 
greatest films. The first festival showing since 




Intolerance 

the thirties of Max Linder's Seven Years' Bad 
Luck, a comedy that strongly influenced the 
career of Charlie Chaplin. An evening of out- 
standing films by West Coast independent film- 
makers. Two silent Westerns with the Good-Bad 
Man, William S. Hart (piano accompaniment 
provided), An evening with Gish and Barthelmess 
in D.W. Griffith's Broken Blossoms and Way 
Down East. Nine West Coast premieres of films 
by American minority group members — young 
Black filmmakers, Puerto Ricans, children and a 
compelling first film by a member of the Navajo 
tribe. A stunning new film from the American 
cinema-verite school. An evening of serials and 
other "B" movies. And more, including what we 
hope will be the first showing since 191 6 of D. 
W. Griffith's Intolerance complete with orches- 
tral accompaniment. 

The festival opens on February 1 1 with No 
Man's Land, directed in 1932 by Victor Trivas. 
Beginning with a montage of Paris street scenes 
that rivals any avant-garde film of the day, the 
film movies to the battlefields of World War 1. 
An international group of men are huddled 
together in a foxhole. As the shells ex- 
plode over their heads, they develop an under- 
standing of themselves and their relationship to 
one another. They realize that war itself, not 
man is the enemy. The film's thunderous finale 
is accented by Hans Eisler's heroic score. 
Memorable, indeed. And a memorial to Victor 
Trivas who died this past year. 



Seldom has such stunning drama taken place 
on an austere, platform stage as in Sir Tyrone 
Guthrie's Oedipus Rex, shown in the Pacifica 
Film Festival on February 18. The Stratford 
Ontario Shakespeare Festival players donned 
robes and larger-than-fifesize masks to present a 
stylized, dazzling performance of the Oedipus 
myth. The Chorus wears strange, rubberized 
masksandglovesthat extendtheir fingers, lending 
the production a horrific, dreamlike quality. 
Douglas Campbell intones his lines in the true 
Greek manner as Oedipus. The rest of the cast 
does likewise, adding a remarkable blend of 
musical art to the considerable dramatic and 
filmic strength of the work. The Guthrie 
Oedipus is a return to the past that is as 
contemporary as today. 

Closer to us in time but a visit to the past 
nonetheless are the two films of Rudolph 
Valentino scheduled for February 25. The Four 
Horsemen of the Apocalypse confirmed the 
reputation of Rex Ingram as a director, put the 
company which produced it, Metro, into the 
major class, and established Valentino, then an 




unknown actor, as a star. The symbolic sequences 
of the four horsemen galloping through clouds 
over a battlenorn world were reminiscent of 
Griffith's The Birth of a Nation. Large crowd 
scenes suggested the best of the German cinema. 
The entire blend of exotic settings, dramatic 
lighting and striking compositions led critics of 
the day to hail the film as a masterpiece. Shown 
with it will be Ingram's next film, The Conquering 
Power, a pure and atmospheric romance taken 
from the Balzac novella, Eugenie Grandet. This 
film, long believed lost, was recently found by 
the American Film Institute and restored for 
preservation at the Library of Congress. 

Cinema verite provides a marked contrast to 
Ingram's misty cinematography. Among films of 
this kind — the camera-as-truth films — one of 

KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



the best is Derby, shown on March 4. Robert 
Kaylor was asked to make a film about the 
Roller Derby. He soon found himself doing 
much more. His portrait of a blue-collar 
American who seeks a new life as a skating star 
is a stunning achievement. Sensitively filming 
the most intimate aspects of the young man's 
life, Kaylor has produced a profile of contempo- 
rary America. Mike Snell, the hero of the film, 
is as ordinary as any other working man and yet 
harbors an inordinate desire to make his life 
more exciting. In the hopelessness of his predica- 
ment, in the dead-end option that the Derby 
presents, all the frustrations of his and thousands 
of other lives become clear. By comparison such 
films as Joe seem artificial. 

Seven Years' Bad Luck is a forgotten delight 
revisited. The masterful French mime. Max 
Linder, shows in this hilarious film why he was 
considered to be the mentor of Charlie Chaplin. 
As a wacky, sophisticated wag, he blunders 
through a series of misfortunes and lands, 
inevitably, on his feet. This long-lost film will be 
recieving its first festival exposure since the 
thirties on March 1 1 . Piano accompaniment will 
be provided. 

San Francisco has become known the world 
over as a center for avant-garde filmmaking. On 
March 18 the Pacifica Film Festival will feature 
a selection of films by West Coast independent 
film artists. The selection is culled from five 
programs shown at the New York Film Festival. 
Works by Jordan Belson, Kenneth Anger, Larry 
Jordan, Bruce Baillie, Karen Johnson's award- 
winning Orange, computer made films by the 
Whitney brothers and others will be shown. 
Ranging from the explosive visual assault of 
Patrick O'Neil's 7362 to the subdued poetry of 
Tung by Bruce Baillie, the program suggests that 
a revolutionary breakthrough in avant-garde 
filmmaking has been made in California. Not 
since the days of Frank Stauffacher and the Art 
in Cinema series at the San Francisco Musaam of 
Art in 1947 has there been such a ferment in 
Bay Area films. This indeed is the world capital 
of independent filmmaking and we hope that the 
Pacifica Film Festival program will be represen- 
tative of the storehouse of talent to be found in 
the West. 

George Pal was a Hungarian-born refugee who 
turned to cartooning in Amsterdam in the 
1930's. His innovative touch with animation 
earned him a contract with Paramount Pictures, 
where he became known as a master of special 
effects. In 1950 his Destination Moon won one 
of his eight Academy Awards. It was the first 
Technicolor science fiction film and remains 
today one of the best. John Archer, Warner 
Anderson, Tom Powers and Dick Wesson were 
the astronauts in a trip to the moon fraught with 
danger and heroism; a bit dated, perhaps, but 
quite as exciting as Apollo 11 and much less 
mechanized. Destination Moon will be shown 
with Moon 1969 by Scott Bartlett, a stunning 
contemporary variant on space travel. 

[Continued on p. 48] 5 




RESTAURANT 
REVIEW 

by 

Michael & Carol 
Barclay 



ZLATA' KACHNA 

("The Golden Duck") 

240 Battery Street, San Francisco 

Telephone: 434-3072 

Hours: 11:30AM - 2:30 PM; 

5:30 - 10:00 PM Monday - Friday 

(N.B.: The bar is open all day and serves 

wonderful snacks and sandwiches.) 

Zlata' Kachna is one of the most remarkable 
evenings you can spend! An stmosphere of 
calm, simple Middle European elegance and 
charm pervades the food, service, staff and 
decor. Host Milos Stika has designed a unique 
menu of perfectly prepared dishes from the 
cuisines of Czechoslovakia and her neighbors. 
He has thought out every item on the menu, 
from a most unusual and enormous cocktail. 
The Channel Crossing, to a delightful after- 
thought. The Golden Duckling. Both drinks 
are creative . . . really! Dinner is easily a two 
hour affair because the service is perfectly 
paced. Lunches run about $3.00 per. Com- 
plete dinners ( appetizer, soup or salad entree, 
dessert and coffee) from $5.00 to $9.00 with 
the average being $7.50. Everyone we've sent 
for dinner has been astonished that this 
beautiful experience of food and relaxation 
is available at these prices. 
We suggest — Appetizers: Domaci pastika, a 
magnificent pate served well chilled with a 
cherry dressing. This is what all those other 
pates you've tried were supposed to be about. 
OR Quiche Lorraine, a light before dinner 
slice of a very Parisian Quiche OR Shrimp a 
la Grace, a huge bed of bay shrimp in a garlic 
butter dressing — finally someone hasfigured 
out what to do with bay shrimp! 
Soup: Each soup available is fine but you 
may find the beautifully seasoned Goulash- 
suppe a bit heavy with a sea-food entree. A 
most unusual Vichysoisse is available. 
Salad: Caesar is otherworldly — your host 
creates it before your eyes with magic and 
love — very light on the anchovies which suits 
us both fine! House dressing is lovely, and 
salad, rather than soup for you, ff your ap- 
petite is gentle. 

Entrees: Zlata kachna, Pacena — a dry roasted 
Czech duck — it's what this place is famous 
for — a most unusual dish but subject to the 
vagaries of your individual fowl, because 
what you get is DUCK! Golden Duck aux 
Cerises Flambe — the most elegant duck 



we've encountered - flames, then swims in 
brandy and flames again ... da capo. 
Cherry sauce is subtle and exciting. This dish 
will become a San Francisco landmark. 
Golden Oysters Ruedy - this is an oyster 
lover's dish for the oysters are simply pre- 
sented in a lemony cream, seasoned with 
nutmeg on a bed of rice. Ruedy knows about 
oysters! Fifteen additional unusual and tradi- 
tional dinners are equally considered and 
prepared! 

Desserts: Mousse - too light, but Mrs. Stika's 
cheesecake is the real thing — exquisite. 
And have a Golden Duckling if you can still 
indulge and ask Milos about its creation. All 
this and a slide show too! 
This must be your first restaurant of the 
New Year! 

THE SAVOY-TIVOLI 

1434 Grant Avenue, North Beach 

San Francisco 362-7023 

Hours: Every day. North Beach hours 

This palace of camp offers an incredible 
decor (which works), a mostly gay bar and a 
small number of excellent dinners in the 
$3.00 category. The tourist and North Beach 
clientele dine in this cavernous musee of 
quasi artifacts, potted palms and people. Tin 
trees, iron ponds, good service and the best 
sweetbreads in North Beach. The frog legs 
Dore were turkey sized — three succulent 
young legs and three that had jumped too 
long, very strange! Paella will suit some and 
displease others, very spicy since it features 
hot Spanish chorizo sausage and is rather dry 
as opposed to soupy — we like it a lot! The 
promised mushrooms had vanished from our 
last sweetbread saute but the lovely breading 
was intact — if you've always wanted to try 
sweetbreads this is the place. Excellent daily 
soups rival our own Berkeley specials ( at Pot 
Luck, for example) and the dinner salads are 
quite good. This is not the place for beef, 
which is very, very ordinary West Coast beef 
— enough said. The Sangria, available four 
ways, is the best in town — a large pitcher 
is $2.25 and serves four quite nicely. Token 
desserts can be overlooked but in toto this is 
a really fun place to bring your out-of-town 
friends or eat yourself before a Sunday Night 
Pippin Concert at the Old Spaghetti Factory 
around the corner on Green Street. What- 
ever you do, don't try the spaghetti at the 
Factory. 



MUSE AGHAST 

By Charles Amirkhanian 




Alois Haba: Nonet No. 1. Op. 40 (1931); 

Quartet No. 11, Op. 87 (1958); Quartet 

No. 12, Op. 90 (1960); Quartet No. 13, 

Op. 92, "Astronautic" (1960) 
Czech Nonet; Novak Quartet 
*Supraphon SUA 10524 

The Moravian composer, Alois Haba (b. 
June 21 , 1893), is a pioneer in the use of the 
tones perceivable by the human ear which fall 
between the notes playable on the piano. As 
early as 1923 Haba was a member of the 
faculty of the Prague Conservatory, teaching 
microtone composition. His harmonic and 
melodic theories were put forth in The New 
Treatise of the Diatonic, Chromatic, 1/4, 1/3, 
1/6and 12-Tone Systems, published in 1927. 
As a boy, Haba played violin at festivals in 
East Moravia and it was there that the youth 
noticed that folk singers employed intervals 
unequal to those which were generally 
thought proper for use in "serious music." 
Suffice it to say that this issue is the most re- 
markable collection of Haba's music yet 
issued. Performances and sonics combine to 
make a very convincing argument for these 
works. 
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-flat, 

Op. 19; Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No-. 3 

in C, Op. 26 

Kapell, piano; Golschmann, NBC Sym- 
phony; Dorati, Dallas Symphony 
Victrola VIC 1520 (Monaural) 

These two performances, dating from 
1946 and 1949 respectively, feature as piano 
soloist William Kapell, whose incredibly 
brilliant career was cut short by a plane crash 
on October 29, 1953. (He had just turned 31 
on that September 20th). This reissue of two 
exciting performances is a welcome one and 
the sound is extremely good. It makes one 
wish that each recording company would pub- 
lish lists of recordings lying dormant in their 
vaults, but which are not presently commer- 
(Continued on p. 43) 



4EB14 ZDQnilTOn 



By Alan Farley 



Public Television (PTV) may not be as 
pure as Caesar's wife, in fact a number of 
events in recent months cause one to wonder 
if it is any more likely than the commercial 
networks to be immune from the pressures 
of large business interests and the provincial 
mentalities of its affiliated stations. While in 
the last few years PTV has been making more 
sounds like a real network (i.e. interconnec- 
tion), it is at the same time falling prey to 
some of the worst traps of the commercial 
industry. 

One example: The pressures of local 
stations to not carry controversial material, 
witness a recent PBS broadcast of Staggerlee, 
an interview with Black Panther leader Bobby 
Seale, produced by KQED in San Francisco, 
(one of the handful of PTV stations that 
have occasionally produced exceptional pro- 
grams). Even as edited from its original 
presentation on Channel 9, it proved too 
much for nearly two-thirds of the PTV 
affiliates. To quote from Variety, reporting 
the results of a survey of PTV stations: 
"The 108 stations (of 171 PTV 
affiliates solicited) reported on clear- 
ances for three shows, the web's tennis 
coverage, a July 30 President Nixon 
press conference from California, and 
Staggerlee .... Some 74 % of 
the reporting stations carried the tennis 
matches, 66% carried the Nixon press 
conference; 38% carried Bobby Seale." 
Variety comments: "The new Public 
Broadcasting Service's affiliates are turning 
out to be more like their commercial counter- 
parts than anyone expected." 

Another recent controversy surrounds the 
production of a PTV series by consumer 
advocate Ralph Nader and the bestowing of a 
large grant on PTV by the Mobil Oil 
Corporation. While no overt connection has 
been shown, there are a number of interesting 
coincidences and relationships. Here, at least, 
is the sequence of events: The Nader Report 
was to have premiered on October 7 with a 
tough program on deceptive advertising in 
television, and was said by industry sources 
to have included a Mobil Oil commercial as 
an example of a deceptive ad. Shortly before 
the debut date, the start of the series was 
postponed for a month, and when it did begin 
it started with a tame study of a company 
town, not the segment on advertising. It was 
rumored that the Mobil commercial would 
(Continued on p. 43) 



THIS MONTH WE PRESENT ANOTHER ARTICLE IN OUR SERIES ON THE 
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT AND THE BROADCAST 
MEDIA. IN THE PAST MONTHS, WE HAVE PRESENTED THE VIEWS OF 
one very outspoken member of the FCC, Nicholas Johnson, and of the National 
Association of Broadcasters, as expressed at their recent Regional Conference in 
San Francisco. 

The following is excerpted from an 
an address by Richard S. Salant, President 
of CBS News, expressing his views as a 
representative of a large commercial 
network. The address was presented at a 
meeting of the Tennessee Association of 
Broadcasters on October 16, 1970 at 
Gatlinburg, Tennessee. A complete 
reading of this address can be heard on 
KPFA at 11:00 PM, on Friday, February 
12th. 



This surpassingly lovely piece of America is 
hardly the ideal place for me to shout warnings 
that the British — or even the Feds — are coming. 
But as Eric Sevareid said in his Elmer Davis 
Memorial Lecture, "Liberties can be defended 
only as long as we still have them." And if the 
liberties about which I want to talk today are to 
be protected, they must be defended as soon as 
the first sign of a threat to them appears. 

I am persuaded that at least the first signs of 
threats have indeed appeared. What I want to do 
today is share with you, first, the reasons for my 
concern, and second, some general suggestions 
of what we might do about it. 

Unfortunately, as you will see, my concerns 
are more numerous and specific than my pro- 
posals for remedies. 

In all fairness, it should be said at the outset 
that the problems were not created by Vice 
President Agnew. The fact is that the relation- 
ship between the government and the press has 
always been tense and uneasy. Indeed, many 
thoughtful students of journalism contend that 
the press's primary and most vital function is to 
act as an adversary to the government. As an 
editor put it a half century ago, "The only way 
for a reporter to look at a politician is down." 

Over the years, the press has had some very 
harsh things to say about presidents of the 
United States — and vice versa. 

. . . But for the print media - or at least 
those whose publishers and editors have spines, 
and that is most of them — all this was a game. 
It was only a game for the fundamental reason 
that the presidents knew, and the publishers, 
editors and reporters knew, that there wasn't 
really much that the government officials could 
do to back up their angry words. Those wars, 
with the government on one side and the news- 
papers on the other, were between equals. 




And there's the rub. Some people are more 
equal than others, and so it follows that some 
are less equal than others. The albatross which 
broadcast journalism must bear is its built-in 
inequality. When it comes to broadcast journal- 
ism, there's a fundamental change in the rules. 
Whether or not the government will do anything 
about us, the broodingly omnipresent fact is 
that it can. 

This is so simply because broadcast journal- 
ism is a part of a business which is pervasively 
regulated and, above all, licensed — licensed by 
appointees of the very government which so 
often is in an adversary relationship with us. 
And as far as the First Amendment is concerned, 
this brutal fact has made us at best second- 
class citizens among American journalists. In 
what had been a battle between equals, a war of 
words, in respect of the new form of journalism 
— broadcast journalism — one side, the govern- 
ment, had a new weapon — nothing less than 
the power of capital punishment over its 
adversary. 

With that kind of weapon, it takes an 
extraordinarily self-restrained governemnt 
official not to invoke the presence, at least, of 
his life-and-death power over us when he 
becomes outraged. And even if he doesn't remind 
us of it, it's hard for us to forget that he has it, 
and that he just may use it. 

KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



. . . Unhappily, the conduct of federal 
officials has compounded — even exploited — 
this vulnerability which arises out of the fact of 
licensing and regulation. 

... All this — the practical implications of a 
press which struggles to be free under a system 
of licensing — was summed up in The Adversaries 
a recent book by Professor William L. Rivers of 
the Stanford Communications Department and 
some of his graduate students in journalism. The 
book advances the thesis, which I've already 
noted, that the major function of journalism is 
as adversary to the government. They wrote that 
with the increasing manipulation of the news 
media by those in and out of power, it becomes 
more imperative than ever for the service of 
democracy that the press dig, that it resist the 
easy route of serving as conduits, as amplifiers, 
as transmission belts for any group. But the 
authors conclude that perhaps the most 
"inhibiting factor against broadcast journalism 
ever playing the role of adversary" is that every 
"station in the United States operates at the 
sufferance of the federal government." There- 
fore, they write: 

To understand the atmosphere of 
broadcasting, one must imagine news- 
papers, book publishers and film 
companies as being required to obtain 
a federal license before going into 
business and to renew it — giving 
proof of good public service — every 
three years. Such a requirement would 
be intolerable and it would be bitterly 
resisted as contrary to our concept of 
free communication and undoubtedly 
in violation of the First Amendment. 

... I think I could view all of these 
activities, pronouncements and decisions [of 
those who would deny the First Amendment to 
broadcasters] with greater equanimity if I felt 
that the public itself appreciated and demanded 
its rights under the First Amendment. 

. . . Last spring, we conducted a survey for 60 
Minutes on the Bill of Rights, including the 
First Amendment which provides "that Con- 
gress shall make no law . . . abridging the 
freedom of speech or of the press; . . ." We 
asked, "Except in time of war, do you think 
newspapers, radio and television should have the 
right to report any story even if the government 
feels it is harmful to our national interest?" 
Only 42 percent of the respondents said that 
they thought newspapers, radio and television 
should have the right to report such stories; a 
clear majority — 55 percent — said that they 
should not have any such right. 

And so we see that a majority of the 
American people do not support the First 
Amendment when it comes down to specifics. 

Well, this has not been a pleasant litany. What 
it comes down to is that al though it would be an 
exaggeration to say that there is significant 

KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



explicit repression of electronic journalism, the 
portents are disturbing. It is a towering paradox 
that at the very time when surveys tell us people 
rely so heavily on electronic journalism for 
their news, our freedom to present that news is 
most severely under attack. 

As I said, the time to defend liberty is while 
we still have it. I suggest that the first step in that 
defense is for all of us to recognize that there 
are dangers and that this excruciating dilemma 
presented by the traditions of a free press, on 
the one hand, and the antithetical phenomenon 
of licensing on the other hand, must be faced 
and must be resolved. We have a long, hard 
road ahead, but the need to go there is impera- 
tive if broadcasting is to fulfill its function as' a 
part of the free press. There is no panacea, no 
magic solution to solve all our problems, no 
easy answers — it is hardly practical to expect 
stations suddenly to be granted licenses in 
perpetuity. But let me suggest these very 
difficult steps. 

First, all of us in broadcast journalism — not 
only the reporters, the editors, the producers 
and the news directors — but also you, the pub- 
lishers, the owners and the managers — must do 
our level best to follow Elmer Davis' profoundly 
simple and profoundly difficult injunction, 
"Don't let 'em scare you." Without being defiant 
arrogant, or self-righteous , about it, we in 
journalism must try to make/news judgments in 
the most independent and honest way of which 
we are humanly capable, and you in manage- 
ment must insist that news judgments be so 
based. We must try to achieve the extraordinary 
mental feat of putting out of our minds the 
presence of that Sword of Damocles called 
licensing, which hangs over all our heads. If 
newsmen do not tell the truth as they see it 
because it might make waves, or if their bosses 
decide something should or should not be broad- 
cast because of Washington or Main Street 
consequences, we have dishonored ourselves and 
we have lost the First Amendment by default. 

All that is easy to say, but it's mighty hard to 
do. It takes an awesome amount of guts — yours, 
ours and our stockholders'. But freedom never 
inures to those who do not prize it. 

Second, all of us must speak out — vigorously 
— wherever and whenever we genuinely believe 
that we see a threatened erosion of the rights of 
any part of the press and any part of broadcast- 
ing. We have not always had an impeccable 
record on that score. Sometimes, we have not 
recognized that freedom is indivisible. We have 
tended to sit back and say "Your end of the 
boat is sinking." We have sometimes not been 
quick enough to speak out when it is somebody's 
else's ox being gored. This is tough, because the 
cases which are damaging to freedom are often 
cases where the print media or the broadcaster 
has said things which outrage you and me and 
which we believe should never have been printed 
or spoken or shown. 

(Continued on p. 46) 



9 



Opera Plot Summary 



THE MAID OF PSKOV 
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov 

Sunday, February 28, 2:00 PM 



ACT 1 - Pskov, 1570. In the garden of Prince 
Takmakov, girls, the friends of Olga, are playing 
games. As night falls, the old nurses, Vlasevna and 
Perfilevna, quietly gossip among themselves while 
looking after the girls. Olga remains alone, not taking a 
part in the games as she longs for her dear one, 
Mikhailo Tucha. The girls try to encourage Olga to join 
them in the ball game. During this time, Perfilevna 
asks Vlasevna whether or not there is any truth in what 
people are saying about Olga not being the Prince's 
daughter, but of higher social status. Vlasevna quickly 
changes the subject. There is news of unrest in 
Novgorod as Ivan "The Terrible" has sent his 
"Oprichniki" there. Styosha, a friend of Olga's draws 
her aside and relates a message from Mikhailo. In the 
evening, he will be in the garden to meet her. Only now 
Olga happily joins the girls. 

Unexpectedly Mikhailo's song is heard and Vlasevna 
ushers the remaining girls into the house. Mikhailo 
arrives in the garden and explains to Olga that he 
wishes to go to Siberia and return to Pskov rich so that 
he might ask Prince Tokmakov for Olga's hand. Olga 
implores him to remain in Pskov and she promises she 
will beg of her father for consent. Olga's father can be 
heard talking in the background with Matuta. Mikhailo 
quickly leaves while Olga remains sadly amid the bird 
-cheery trees and accidently overhears the conversation 
of her father and Matuta. It seems Olga has been be- 
trothed to Matuta and Prince Yuri wants to make him 
aware of a family secret. It appears Olga is not Yuri's 
daughter at all. In actuality she was born to Yuri's 
sister-in-law, -Vera Shalaga, of an unknown father. 
Suddenly the bells can be heard calling the citizens of 
Pskov to a council meeting. The Prince and Matuta 
leave and Olga slowly emerges from the thicket with 
her sould in confusion. 

Scene 2 is set in Torgovaya Square at night in Pskov. 
A crowd has gathered. A messenger from Novgorod 
announces the city has fallen to Ivan the Terrible and 
his "Oprichniki." He continues that the "oprichniki" 
are on their way to Pskov. Tokmakov suggests the 
people greet the Tsar with bread and salt, a tradition 
of friendly welcome among the Slavic people. Mikhailo 
steps forward, proposing the people of Pskov should 
remain independent. A segment of Pskov's populace 
joins him as they leave for the nearby forest. The song 
of the Pskov freedom fighters can be heard over the 
bells calling the council to an end as the rest of the 
crowd disperses. 

ACT II - The first scene of Act II is set on a square in. 
front of Prince Tokmakov's tower. A crowd of people, 
gathers where tables have been assembled upon 
Tokmakov's advice to greet Ivan the Terrible with, 
the traditional bread and salt. However, these pre- 
parations are not being made with great enthusiasm 
and the people of Pskov are filled with oppressive 
expectations. As the entourage of Ivan comes closer to 
the city, the Square becomes absolutely empty. 
Olga and Vlasevna are on the porch of the tower. Olga 
is still befuddled over the unexpected conversation of 
Tokmakov, heard the previous evening. She recalls 
sadly when she was a child visiting her real mother.'s 
grave, not realising who she was. Being aware of the 
match between Olga and Matuta, Vlasevna tries to 
console her but Olga doesn't want to listen to her. Alas 
Ivan the Terrible arrives with the "oprichniki" as the 
scene closes. 



Scene 2 is set in the Tokmakov home, where the Tsar is 
being received. Olga, Styosha, Vlasevna and servant 
girls emerge from the passages with trays containing 
a large variety of food. Raising her eyes, Olga carries a 
cup of drink to Ivan. Ivan and Tokmakov exchange 
toasts. Soon Ivan the Terrible recognizes certain 
characteristics about Olga that remind him of Vera 
Shalaga, Olga's mother. Kissing Olga, Ivan gives her a 
ring and suggests that she visit Moscow. The Tsar asks 
of Vera, realizing that Olga is his daughter. Tokmakov 
does not conceal the truth in explaining the fate of 
Vera Shalaga. Ivan is quite touched and shows deep 
emotion as the act closes. 



ACT III — In the first scene, people line the road in 
the deep forest on the way to Pechersky Monastery. 
As night falls chanting can be heard. Girls come to the 
forest on a pilgrimage. A short while later, Olga emerges 
from the group. She waits for Mikhailo Tucha who 
suddenly overtakes her. She attempts to persuade him 
to return to Pskov but he flatly refuses. Hb asks Olga 
to remain with him for a free and carefree life. As she 
now knows Prince Yuri is not her real father, she 
agrees to stay with Mikhailo, since there is nothing to 
go back to in Pskov. Suddenly out of the forest comes 
Matuta with a contingent of servants. In the skirmish, 
Mikhailo is wounded and left unconscious. As the 
curtain falls, the servants drag Olga off with them. 



Scene 2 is set on a river bank on a moonlit night. The 
Tsar's entourage has camped here for the night. All are 
asleep save Ivan, who remembers his meeting in this 
same forest with Vera Shalaga many years previously. 
Ivan's thoughts are interrupted by the "oprichniki" 
who have captured Matuta and the kidnapped Olga. 
Despite Ivan's anger, Matuta demands the center of 
attention. He tells the Tsar he captured Olga during a 
rendezvous with the chief opponent of the Tsar, 
Mikhailo Tucha. Ivan orders that Olga be brought in. 
She drops to the Tsar's feet, imploring that she be 
freed from Matuta's encroachment and that Mikhailo 
be pardoned. With trusting frankness she tells Ivan that 
when she was a child she was accustomed to repeating 
the following prayer: "Gospodi, pomilui otsa i Gosudar 
moyevo!" Noise and shouts interrupt their con- 
versation. From the outside the voice of Mikhailo can 
be heard. He has come with a detachment of freedom 
fighters to free Olga. Angered by the impudent attack, 
Ivan orders that all the freedom fighters be shot except 
Mikhailo, whom he wants brought to him. Olga wishes 
to run from the tent but Ivan holds her back. All the 
freeman are killed save Mikhailo who manages to 
escape. His words of farewell to Olga are carried by the 
wind. In a fit of courage, Olga flees from the tent and 
is struck by a stray bullet. One of the Tsar's friends 
slowly brings back Olga's body to the tent and places 
it on a carpet. Ivan the Terrible, terrified, bows over 
her, not being able to believe his eyes. Olga, his 
daughter, is dead! 

The area is soon surrounded with the citizens of Pskov 
mourning over the fallen freemen and Olga's death. As 
the curtain falls the people chant for the cessation of 
this bloodshed in the name of the unification of the 
Russian land. 



BS3SSSSS3SSSS 



10 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



Commentators/February 71 



Monday 1 

MIKECULBERT 

Executive Editor 
of the Berkeley 
Gazette 


Tuesday 2 

PETER SHAPIRO 

Member of the Joe 
Hill Caucus of SDS 
at S.F. State 


Wednesday 3 

SYLVIA M.SIEGEL 

Executive Director, 
Association of 
California Consumers 


Thursday 4 

DENNIS ALLEN 

Peace Education 
Secretary, American 
Friends Service Com- 
mittee of N. California 


Friday 5 

DICKMEISTER 

Labor writer 


Saturday 6 

FATHER EUGENE 
BOYLE Chairman, 
Commission on Social 
Justice, Archdiocese 
of San Francisco 


Monday 8 

TOM HAYDEN 

Political activist, 
Chicago Conspiracy 
defendan t 


Tuesday 9 

LEWIS SHERMAN 

Bay Area attorney 


Wednesday 10 

CYSCHOENFIELD 

Director of Student 
Research Facility, 


Thursday 11 

SIDNEY ROGER 

Journalist specializing 
in labor affairs 


Friday 12 

BRUCE FRANKLIN 

From the Central 
Committee of the 
Revolutionary Union 


Saturday 13 

To Be Announced 


Monday 15 

MIKECULBERT 

Executive Editor 
of the Berkeley 
Gazette 


Tuesday 16 

BOB FITCH 

Freelance writer 


Wednesday 17 

CYSCHOENFIELD 

Director of Student 
Research Facility, 
Berkeley 


Thursday 18 

ROBERT PICKUS 

President, World 
Without War Council 
of the United States 


Friday 19 

ROBERT TIDEMAN 

Director, Henry George 
School of Social 
Science, S.F. 


Saturday 20 

HENRY ANDERSON 

Freelance social analyst 
and writer 


Monday 22 

HENRY RAMSEY 

Richmond attorney 


Tuesday 23 

DAVID BORTIN 

Bay Area attorney 
who usually discusses 
"law and order" 


Wednesday 24 

CYSCHOENFIELD 

Director of Student 
Research Facility, 
Berkeley 


Thursday 25 

HAL & ANNE DRAPER 

International Socialists, 
active in labor and 
political affairs 


Friday 26 

BRUCE FRANKLIN 

From the Central 
Committee of the 
Revolutionary Union 


Saturday 27 

STEVE MURDOCK 

Writer and commentator 
on political affairs 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS PROGRAM PRODUCERS 



John Hopkins, educational assistant for the Consumer's 
Cooperative of Berkeley. 

Marve Hyman, chemical engineer and lecturer on pol- 
lution control and computer applications. 

Richard Lock, former resident and teacher in Japan, 
now doing graduate work in Berkeley. 



William Mandel, widely recognized authority on the 
USSR and contributor to many scholarly works. 
Keith Murray, of the Ecology Center 

Helga Lohr-Bailey, journalist and writer, who has re- 
cently returned after a prolonged stay in the 
Eastern European world. 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



11 



HIGHLIGHTS FEBRUARY 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS 



VIETCETERA: AND THE WAR GOES ON 
The Sunday Night Documentaries — 

Sundays at 9:00 PM 

7 The Thin Veneer of Cooperation 
14 Ten Years of Struggle: programs 
21 documenting the history of the N.L.F. 

28 The Visit: or, Kys to the City 

1 Take-Off Ky: members of the Committee 
of Concerned Asian Scholars respond to 
the Vice President of South Vietnam 

11:15 AM 

20 National Veterans' Inquiry into U.S. 
War Crimes Policy 7:00 PM 

21 Eyewitness Vietnam: A Middle Class 
View 8:30 PM 

The New Asia: programs from a series sponsored 
by the World Affairs Council of Northern Calif. 
13 Asia in the Seventies: New Problems — 
New Perspectives, Dr. Haydn Williams 

5:00 PM 

22 The Implications of Indochina, 
Dr. Franz Schurmann 

11:00 PM 
27 A Businessman's View of Asia in the 

Seventies, Charles Robinson 9:00 PM 



FOUR OTHER SERIES 

The 70th Annual E.T. Earl Lectures, recorded 

at programs sponsored by the Pacific School of 

Religion 

I. Prof. Paul Lehmann of Union Theological 
Seminary, "New Testament Paradigms of 
Revolutionary Action" 19, 22, 23 

11:45 AM 

II. Prof. Martin Marty, "The Moment Between 
Two World Views" 25, 26 .(March 1) 

11:45 AM 
Alternative Education in the Bay Area: six 
programs produced by KPFA volunteer 
Bob Morris 

& 8:00 PM 



(IS 

.5 

8 

15 
16 
16 



THERE ANY) JUSTICE IN AMERICA? 

Bending Over Backwards: The Justice 
Department on Tour 11:00 PM 

The Legalization of Marijuana, 
Prof. John Kaplan 11:00 PM 

Law and Law and Order 11:00 PM 

Law and Order in the Seventies 12:45 PM 
Who Controls the Police? 9:30 PM 



RADICAL PERSPECTIVES 

4 An Interview with Jennifer Dohrn 

10:00 PM 
9 William Hinton: The Cultural Revolution 
in China 10:00 PM 

13 Huey Newton at Oakland Technical 

High School 10:30 PM 

24 Revolutionary History: A Black Panther's 
View of America's Past 8:00 PM 

24 Harry Magdoff : The Age of 

Imperialism 10:45 PM 

ENVIRONMENTAL FOCUS 

Public Lands - One-Third of a Nation: 
four programs from the Western Regional 
Conference on the Report of the Public 
Land Law Commission 

4 Saturdays 6, 13,20,27 

1:30 PM 

12 The Fallacy of Connecting "Over- 
population" with Misery 11:15 AM 
27 Rape at Black Mesa 11:15 AM 



6 11:30AM 

11 9:30 PM 

20 11:15 AM 

21 1:00 PM 



& 8:00 PM 



THE WAYLESS WAY: A Meditation Being 
with Jack Gariss 

moves to Sundays at 10:00 AM 

SPECTRUM, from Carlos Hagen at KPFK 
Thursdays at 11:00PM 






DRAMA & LITERATURE 



ON FILM 

The Pacifica Film Festival. A program on 
KPFA's film fistival, which open tomorrow 
for a five-month run at the M.H. de Young 
Museum 

February 10, 8:00 PM 
Richard Rush, Director. Alan Farley and 
Margo Skinner talk with the director 
of Getting Straight. 
February 9, 9:00 PM 

Before You Trust in Critics. Joseph 
Morgenstern of Newsweek and 
Stephen Kanfer of Time discuss 
their role as critics. 
February 7, 1:00 PM 
February 23,9:00 PM 
Feinstein and Fonda. Herbert Feinstein talks 
with actor Henry Fonda. 
February 2, 11:30 PM 



PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS 



ON THEATER 

A Visit With Noel Coward. George Cleve 
presents a selection of songs and theater 
pieces of Noel Coward. 
February 4, 9:00 PM 

Lee Strasberg and the New York Actor's 
Studio. Bob Adler talks with the noted 
director and teacher about his work. 
February 14, 21, 28, 7:00 PM 

On Stage: In a Lighter Vain 

Friday evenings at 
9:00 PM 

She Stoops to Conquer 

by Oliver Goldsmith 

February 5 
The School for Scandal 

by R.B. Sheridan 

February 12 

Caesar and Cleopatra 
by G.B. Shaw 
February 19 

The Importance of Being Ernest 
by Oscar Wilde 

February 26 



ON LITERATURE 

"Biafra Goodbye." An interview with 

Herbert Gold, author of Biafra 

Goodbye. 

February 25,9:00 PM 
David Gitin introduces a reading 

of poems by William Carlos Williams. 

February 15, 10:00 PM 

Morning Reading, Weekday mornings at 10:45 
The Anything Box, read by Bill Cavness. 



ON DANCE 

Baird Searles talks with Ann Hutchinson 
about dance notation. 
Fabruary 9, 11:30 AM 




MUSIC 



1 KAREL HUSA 

1 WORLD EAR PROJECT 

2 NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE 

4 GEORGE CLEVE PRESENTS 
NOEL COWARD 

4 ELLYAMELING 

8 YOUNG POLISH COMPOSERS 

10 WHIMPERING DISC JOCKEY 

12 ALAN HOVHANESS 

13 AN EVENING WITH 

DONALD PIPPIN 

14 QUADRAPHONIC: INCREDIBLE 

STRING BAND 

14 SEVEN AGES OF JAZZ 

WITH ELWOOD 

15 KOUSSEVITZKY 

15 KURPINSKI 

16 ART TATUM 

19 SCHOENBERG'S CHORAL MUSIC 

21 QUADRAPHONIC: OAKLAND 

SYMPHONY 

22 NADEZHDA ANDREIEVA 

OBUKHOVA 

23 DOROTHY KIRSTEN SPECIAL 

27 PACI FICA CHAMBER PLAYERS - 

LIVE 

28 QUADRAPHONIC: JOY OF 

COOKING 






coon^>3Ld 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:30 

WEEKLY MONDAY 

Charles Shere 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last Saturday's 

commentary by Steve Murdock. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Music of Karel Husa 

Quartet No. 3 for Strings (1968) 

Fine Arts Quartet 
Music for Prague ( 1 968) 

Revelli, U. Michigan Band 
Concerto for Alto Saxophone 

and Wind Ensemble (1967) 

Rascher, sax.; Husa, Cornell 

Wind Ensemble 
Symphony No. 1 (1952-3) 

Husa, conductor 
Husa (b. 1921, Prague) is noted for 
his conducting as well as his com- 
posing. He currently is on the 
Music Faculty of Cornell University. 
His Quartet No. 3 was awarded a 
Pulitzer Prize in 1969. 

10:45 

MORNING READING 
The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 
11:15 

TAKE-OFF KY 

An "event" organized by the Down- 
town Peace Coalition at high noon 
on Dec. 10 in Zellerbach Plaza in 
San Francisco. Using portions of 
Ky's speech before the Common- 
wealth Club, members of the DPC 
and the Committee of Concerned 
Asian Scholars "re-create" Ky's ad- 
dress — and answer it as they go 
along. Businessmen scurried by 
throughout. 

11:45 

THE IV INTERNATIONAL 
TCHAIKOVSKY COMPETITION 
Third Round 

Musical selections performed by 
prize-winning contestants in the fi- 
nal round of the Competition, which 
was held in Moscow during June, 
1970. Hosted by Radio Moscow's 
Valery Krishkin. 

14 



12:45 

THE WORLD OF COMICS 

Paul Moslander presides in a pro- 
gram on comic books held as part 
of the 26th World Science Fiction 
Conference. KPFA Archives. 
1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES 
& OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last Friday's pro- 
gram. 
3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 
with George Cleve 
Noted young conductor George 
Cleve whose recent successes with 
the San Francisco Symphony have 
made his name known to Bay Area 
audiences presents all of the after- 
noon concerts in February. George's 
live commentaries have helped all 
of us to better understand the classi- 
cal music broadcasts since his arrival 
one Saturday morning in December. 
We hope you enjoy this month of 
ad hoc programming in the after- 
noons. Your responses welcomed. 

WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 

* 5:00 BRITISH PRESS \ 

* REVIEW * 

* 5:15 CALENDAR OF * 

* EVENTS * 

* 5:30 CONFRONTATION: * 

* WASHINGTON * 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY 

* Mike Culbert 

* 6:15 KPFA NEWS 

* 7:00 SOVIET PRESS 

* 8« PERIODICALS 

* William Mandel 

WHAT'S HAPPENING *WHAT'S 



Si»%,*§MM%I 



7:15 

AUDITION/EDITION 
With Richard Friedman 

-*EAK*RAID* 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Timely public affairs coverage. 
9:00 

WORLD EAR PROJECT 
Transmission VI 

More ambient sound recordings 
from around the world. Sent to 
us by freaks from all over the 
world. This program features 
sounds from Mozambique, Ivory 
Coast, Indonesia and other places. 
We are desperate for more tapes 
of environmental sounds record- 
ed anywhere. Doesn't anyone out 
there own a tape recorder? 
HELP! 
10:00 

WRITERS AND WRITING 
Bay Area novelists, writers and 
poets talk about their writing 
and read passages from newly 
published work. 
11:00 

THE THREATENED 
ESCALATION OF THE WAR 
IN SOUTHEAST ASIA: 
Republican Congressman Pete 
McCloskey of San Mateo County 
speaks to citizens at the First. 
Presbyterian Church in Palo Alto 
on Dec. 20, 1970. 

12:00 

AFTERMATH 
MODULAR RESONANCE 
with John Schneider 




Henry Fonda, currently starring in Warner Bros.' "There Was 
A Crooked Man . . .," talks with Herb Feinstein tomorrow 
evening at 11:30 PM. 




8:30 AM 

KPFB: LIVE BROADCAST OF 

BERKELEY CITY COUNCIL 

MEETING 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:45 

IN THE MORNING 
Paul Fagan 
8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Mike Culbert. 
8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 
Debussy: The Martyrdom 

of St. Sebastian 

Munch, Boston Symphony 

Orchestra 

*Victrola VICS 1404 (55) 
Hindemith: Nobilissima Vi- 

sione; Martinon, Chicago 

Symphony Orchestra 

"Victor LSC 3004 (26) 
Stravinsky: Symphony of 

Palms; Stravinsky, CBC 

Symphony Orchestra 

'Columbia MS 6548 (22) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 
11:15 

SOVIET PRESS & 
PERIODICALS 

Rebroadcast of last njght's progran 
with William Mandel. 

11:30 

SINGLE AND PREGNANT 

Ruth Pierce, author of Single and 
Pregnant, talks with Joan Churton 
about her book. 
12:00 
SOS OR 

SAVE OUR SOLDIERS 
An organization formed to work 
in conjunction with the G.I. "cof- 
fee houses" that have sprung up 
all over the country. The speakers 
on this program are Jane Margolis, 
who formerly worked in the Shel- 
ter Half, Fort Lewis; David Shulman, 
a former active-duty Gl, now work- 
ing with SOS in LA; and Paul 
Jacobs, well-known writer, journalist 
and speaker who is a member of 
the Support Committee of SOS. 
The moderator is Elsa Knight Thomp- 
son. 
KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



1:00 9:30 

U. C. NOON CONCERT NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE 

Music of the Univ. Associated Stu- CONCERT 

dents Choral Organizations, the Glee This ensemble from the San Fran- 



Club, the Treble Clef, and the 
Chamber Singers. Conducted by 
Milton Williams. Recorded 12-2-70 
at Hertz Hall, UC, Berkeley. STE- 
REO- 

1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES & 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's program. 



3:00 

CONCERT OF OPERATIC 

RELEASES 

With Alan Ulrich of the 
Opera Staff. 



WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 

TO BE ANNOUNCED 

CALENDAR OF 

EVENTS 

DRAMA AND 

LITERATURE 

REVIEW 

TO BE ANNOUNCED 

COMMENTARY 
Peter Shapiro 

KPFA NEWS 



5:00 
5:15 

5:30 

5:45 
6:00 

6:15 



WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 




7:00 ELWOOD'S ARCHIVES 

Singer Lee Wiley with all star 
jazz accompaniments including 
Fats Waller, Bunny Berigan 
and others. Ca. 1938. 

7:30 

FILM REVIEW 

Margo Skinner 

•EJtfrHAID' 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 



cisco Conservatory of Music is heard 
in an Avant-Garde Christmas Con- 
cert. Recorded Dec. 3, 1970, at 
Hearst Court of the DeYoung Mu- 
seum. 

Henry Purcell: The Queen's Fu- 
neral March and Canzona; 
Fan tazia; March ( re pr i se ) ; 
Variations for Mr. Purcell 
(Orchestrated by Robert 
Moran); ensemble conducted 
by Howard Hersh 
Shin-ichi Matsushita: Subject 17 
Ensemble 
KPFA Gospel Music sung by the G.L. 
Bedford Specials, Richard 
Herron, pianist; Justin 
Cummins, director 
John Cage : Music for Ampli- 
fied Toy Piano; electronics 
by Ivan Tcherepnin; Robert 
Moran, pianist 
Henri Pousseur Madrigal 2 
ensemble conducted by 
Howard Hersh 
Erik Satie: Genevieve de 
Brabant; soloists, chorus, 
instrumental ensemble; 
conducted by Howard 
Hersh. Orchestration 
by Ivan Tcherepnin and 
Howard Hersh. 
Recorded in STEREO by 

George Craig. 
11:00 

REBUTTAL 

Women respond to the sexism that 
pervades the media. An "anti- 
commercial" written by Roberta 
DeBono of the National Organiza- 
tion for Women, and Marilyn Brai- 
ger's reply to a column by Andrew 
Tully that was entitled "Women, 
Politics Just Don't Mix." 
11:30 

FEINSTEIN IN 
CZECHOSLOVAKIA: Henry 
Fonda 

At a film festival in Karlovy Vary 
(Carlsbad), CSSR, Herbert Feinstein 



Documentaries, discussions and spe- f s.F. State talks to Henry Fonda 



cial reports. 

9:00 

AVANT GARDE WEST 

Bob Sitton talks with representa- 



about his significant roles on stage 
and screen. 

12:00 



tives of the West Coast avant-garde "INSIDE ON THE OUTSIDE 
school of film-making. DeLeon Harrison 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:45 

METAPHYSICAL 

IN THE MORNING MIX 

Jim Emdy 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Peter Shapiro. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Mozart: Sinfonia Concertante 
for Violin and Viola, K. 364 
Druian, violio; Skernick, 
viola; Szell, Cleveland Orch- 
estra 
Columbia ML 6025 (31) 

Messiaen: Seven Haikai 
Loriod, piano; Boulez, 
Domaine Musicale Orches- 
tra 
'Everest 3192 (20) 

Gesualdo: Selection of 
Madrigals and Keyboard 
Music; Biggs, organ; 
Rosenstiel, harpsichord; 
Craft, conductor 
•Columbia KL5718 (39) 

Stravinsky: Monumentum 
pro Gesualdo di Venosa 
Stravinsky, Columbia 
Symphony Orchestra 
'Columbia KL5718 (7) 



*» 



11:15 

OLAF PALME 

Betty Pilkington, WBAI's U.N. Cor- 
respondent interviews the Swedish 
Prime Minister. (WBAI) 

11:45 

ON JAPANESE FILM 

Barbara Wolf discusses the uncut 
version of Kobayashi's horror clas- 




sic, Kwaidan. 




12:00 

U.C. NOON CONCERT - 

LIVE 

Music for woodwinds, by Mozart 
and Beethoven. 


% 


1^00 

WE THE PEOPLE... 


'8:00^ 



7:00 

ODE TO GRAVITY 
With Charles Amirkhanian 

Bulb. Snit. Atchet. Pimp Overture. 
Murr. Whale. Roosevelt Chin. Primp. 
Dumb. Scotch. Smumm. Schick. 
Snuffle Robot. Ompson. Tewart. 

EAWKAID*' I 



FOR PEOPLE'S GOVERNMENT 

An address delivered by the Honor- 
able Kenneth Gibson, Mayor of 
Newark, New Jersey, at SCLC's 
Thirteenth Annual Convention. May- 
or Gibson re-evaluates some of our 
historical myths. (MARTIN LU- 
THER KING SPEAKS) 

1:30 

NAKED REASON 

British author George Buchanan 

reads from his new novel. (BBC) 

1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES 

& OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's program. 




11:00 

McCLOSKY'S 
NEW BAG 



GOT A BRAN 



12:00 

CLASSICAL MUSIC AT 

MIDNIGHT 

Michael Dutko 



10:45 3 : °0 

MORNING READING AFTERNOON CONCERT 

The Anything Box, an anthology Wlth George Cleve 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 



WHAT'S HAPPEN I NG # WHAT'§ 


• 


5:00 


GERMAN PRESS • 


* 




REVIEW * 


* 




Helga Lohr-Bailey * 


* 


5:15 


CALENDAR OF * 


* 
* 




EVENTS * 


• 


5:30 


BAY AREA * 


• 




INSTITUTE * 


<t 


6:00 


COMMENTARY 


• 




Sylvia M. Siegel 


* 


6:15 


KPFA NEWS * 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



16 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



l^ClltSt>2LC| 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:45 

METAPHYSICAL 

IN THE MORNING MIX 

Jim Emdy 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Sylvia M. Siegel. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Handel: Concerto Grosso 

Op. 6, No. 10 

Karajan, Berlin Philhar- 
monic Orchestra 

*DGG 139012 (20) 
Bartok: Music for Strings, 

Percussion, and Celesta 

Haitink, Amsterdam 

Concert gebeow 

'Philips 6500 015 (30) 
Beethoven: String Quartet 

No. 14 in C Sharp Minor 

Op. 131; Amadeus 

Quartet 

DGG 18537 (40) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 

11:15 

SOUTHEAST ASIA 
OBSERVED 1954-1970 

That describes Dennis Blood- 
worth's job as a correspondent 
for the London Observer during 
the past sixteen years. It's also 
the subtitle of his most recent 
book, An Eye for the Dragon, 
in which he writes of the con- 
flict of cultures and purposes in 
that area. He talks about the 
book with Bill Northwood of 
KPFA. 



12:15 

NEW RELEASES FROM 

ELLY AMELING 

Highlighting this program will 
be a selection of leider from 
El I y Ameling's latest HMV album 
that she will perform in Berkeley 
and Palo Alto during her Bay 
Area appearances in Feb. Pre- 
pared and produced by Larry 
Jackson. 

1:15 

POETRY READING: 

Wade Stevenson 

The author of Beds reads from 

his works and talks with Bob 

Sitton. 



1:45 

NEWS 

F.Y.I. 



HEADLINES 



3:00 

CONCERT OF NEW 

RELEASES 

With George Cleve 



WHAT'S HAPPENING # WHAT'§ 

* 5:00 MUSIC REVIEW * 
, Charles Amirkhanian * 

* 5:15 CALENDAR OF * 

* EVENTS • 

* 5:30 MILITARY * 

* MONITOR * 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY * 

* Dennis Allen * 

I 6:15 KPFA NEWS * 

* * 
WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 



7:00 

VARIOUS FOLK 

Larry Bartlett 

*E AR*R AI D* 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Timely public affairs coverage. 

9:00 

A VISIT WITH 

NOEL COWARD 

A selection of Coward's songs 
and scenes from Blithe Spirit 
and Present Laughter. George 
Cleve is the host. 

10:00 

AN INTERVIEW 

WITH JENNIFER DOHRN 

Bruce Soloway talks with Jennifer 
Dohrn about the expatriate Amer- 
icans in Algiers, and particularly 
Dr. Timothy Leary. (WBAI) 

10:30 

(FOR YOUNG MEN) 

WARNING: 

THE DRAFT 

MAY BE DANGEROUS 

TO YOUR HEALTH 

11:00 
SPECTRUM 

Cross Country II: Carlos Hagen 
presents a follow-up to an earlier 
program about his experiences on 
a trip across the United States. 
Here he reads some of the letters 
he received, answers questions, 
and talks about his eight years 
in this country. (KPFK) 



12:00 

AFTERMATH 
Jeff Echeverria 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



17 



ptflD2LCJ 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:45 

FRIDAY MORNING 94.1 

Denny Smithson 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Dennis Allen. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 
Piano Music of Debussy 
Preludes, Book 1 
Prelude*, Book 2 
Childrens' Corner Suite 
Suite Bergamasque 
Gieseking, piano 
Odyssey 3236002 1 (106) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 



11:15 

THE KURZWEIL CASE 

CONTINUES 

Although the Statewide Com- 
mittee set up to review his case 
recommended that he be retained 
as Asst. Prof, of Electrical Eng- 
ineering at San Jose State Col- 
lege, Chancellor Dumke has (for 
the second time) terminated his 
services. Jack Kurzweil explains 
to Elsa Knight Thompson why 
his case is important to all college 
professors and why he intends to 
fight Chancellor Dumke'sdecision 
in court. 



12:15 

RUSSIAN FOLK MUSIC 

A selection of popular Russian 
folk songs as presented by Radio 
Moscow. 

12:45 

DAVID LEAN AT THE 
SAN FRANCISCO 
FILM FESTIVAL 

David Lean, director of Ryan's 
Daughter, Lawrence of Arabia, 
and Bridge on the River Kwai, 
joins screenwriter Robert Bolt 
in talking to the audience of the 
I4th S.F. International Film Fest- 
ival. The moderator is Albert 
Johnson, program director of 
the Festival. 

1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

With George Cleve 



WHAT'S HAPPENING # WHAT'S 

5:00 ON FILM 

Bob Sitton 
5:15 CALENDAR OF 

EVENTS 
5:30 ECOLOGY AND 

POLITICS 

Keith Murray 
5:45 TO BE ANNOUNCED 
6:00 COMMENTARY 

Dick Meister 
6:15 KPFA NEWS 
WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 




7:00 JURA-PARIS ROAD 
With Charles Shere. 

Shin-ichi Matsushita's Hexa- 
hedra and the Tzara Mix, 
combined in stereo; 



•EiurmAiD** 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Discussions, documentaries and 
special reports. 

9:00 

ON STAGE 

SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER 

The play by Oliver Goldsmith 

with Alastair Sim, Claire Bloom, 

Brenda de Banzie, Alan Howard, 

and Tony Tanner. Directed by 

Howard Sackler. 

11:00 

BENDING OVER 

BACKWARDS: 

THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT 

ON TOUR 

The Justice Dept. decided it 

needed to improve relations with 

students. So Assistant Attorney 

General William Ruckleshaus was 

dispatched to Mt. Holyoke. This 

program, provided by WFCR in 

Amherst, a Pacifica affiliate, 

illustrates why the project was 

called off after one performance. 

12:00 

INFORMATION TRANS- 
MISSION, MODULATION 
AND NOISE 
Richard Friedman 



18 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



S2JZ 



OLRT>3LCI 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Dick Meister. 

9:00 

MORNING CONCERT 

The Jolly Minstrels 

Minstrel tunes, songs and 

dances of the Middle Ages 

on authentic instruments 

Gerald English, tenor; The 

Jaye Consort of Medieval 

Instruments 

"Cardinal VCS 10049 (36) 

Stravinsky: I'Histoire du Soldat 
(in French) Cocteau, Ustinov, 
Fertey; Markevitch, Ensemble 
Philips PHM 500 046 (53) 

Liszt: Mephisto Waltz 
Kapell, piano 
Victor LM-2588 (13) 



11:00 

CHILDREN'S 
BOOK SAMPLER 
Ellyn Beatty 

11:15 

INCREDIBLE STRING 

BAND: RAINBOW 

11:30 

ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION 

Bob Morris of KPFA talks to 
Janice Simon, one of the found- 
ers of Meridian High School in 
S.F., about starting a free school. 
Then he visits the Berkwood 
School in Berkeley and talks to 
Cynthia Prince, its new director. 

12:00 

REMINISCENCES 
OF A REBEL 
Ben Legere 

12:30 

BOOKS 

With Kenneth Rexroth 

1:00 

MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S 

PEOPLE • 

Miscellaneous selections of ethnic 
music. 

KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



1:30 

PUBLIC LANDS - 

ONE-THIRD OF A NATION 

The first in a series of panels 
at the Western Regional Con- 
ference on the Report of the 
Public Land Law Commission 
held in S.F. Dec 7 and 8, 1970. 



2:45 
JOHNCOLTRANE: 

IMPRESSIONS 

3:00 

WHATEVER BECAME OF... 

Marsha Mae Jones? 

Richard Lamparski talked with 
the star of Heidi and Tom Sawyer 
on his recent visit to Hollywood. 

3:30 
THIN AIR 

A program highlighting cultural 
events in the Bay Area and pre- 
senting a variety of artists who 
visit the KPFA studios. 

4:30 

GOLDEN VOICES 

With Anthony Boucher 

5:00 

MUSIC OF THE ITALIAN 

MASTERS 

Music of GUISEPPE TARTINI, 
played by Endre Granat, violin, 
and Sven Hansell, harpsichord 
Recorded at a concert at S.F. 
State College, Dec. 2, 1971. 
Sonata in F Major 
Sonata in G Major 
Variations on a Gavotte 

by Corelli ("The Art of 

the Bow") 
Sonata in E Minor 
Sonata in G Minor, called 

"Devil's Trill" 



WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 



7:00 

AN IRISH 

ENTERTAINMENT 

Tom Quilter and Edward Calla- 
han read and comment on Gaelic 
poetry in the original and in 
translation. (KPFA Archives). 

8:00 

ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION 

The Learning Place 

The Learning Place is a free 
junior high school in San Fran- 
cisco. Bob Morris of KPFA talks 
to the students and "teachers" 
about their school, experiences 
in public school, and alternative 
education in general. 

8:45 

A TRIBUTE 

TO PAUL ROBESON 

Produced on the occasion of his 
70th birthday (1968), this tribute 
to the athlete, actor, singer, and 
extraordinary man surveys his 
songs and his thoughts. By 
Charles Hobson and Kay Lind- 
sey. 

11:30 

MOTHER 

The 99.5 Radio Theater of WBAI 
presents an original black and 
white comedy by Don DeLillio 
concerning a bed, a great many 
articles in the New York Times 
and three members of the white 
race. With Frank Whiteman, 
Holly Turner, and Joan Farber. 
Directed by Christopher Strater. 
(WBAI) 

12:00 
AFTERMATH 

All-night jazz with Bert Thomas. 



6:00 COMMENTARY 

Father Eugene Boyle 
6:30 KPFA NEWS 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



19 



utlDAa 



T 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

8:30 

MORNING CONCERT 

Four Views of the Mass 
Isaac: Missa Carminum 

Niedersachsischer Singkreis, 
Hannover; Trader, conductor 
*Nonesuch H 71084 
J.S. Bach: Mass in F major, 
BWV 233 

Bach Collegium Musicum, 
Stuttgart; Rilling, conductor 
'Nonesuch HC 73020 (29) 
Mozart: Mass in C major 
("Coronation") K. 317 
Ristenpart, Choir and 
Chamber Orchestra of the 
Saar 

'Nonesuch H 71041 (25) 
Janacek: Slavonic Mass 

Kubelik, Bavarian State Radio 
Orchestra and Chorus 
DGG LPM 18954 (37) 

10:00 

THE WAYLESS WAVLESS: 
A MEDITATION BEING 
With Jack Gariss 

11:00 

JAZZ, BLUES AND 

PHIL ELWOOD 

1:00 

BEFORE YOU TRUST 

IN CRITICS 

Joseph Morgenstern, film critic 
for Newsweek magazine, talks 
with Milton Hoffman about the 
presuppositions of the critic. 

1:30 

THE ISRAELI OPPOSITION 

Tom Ackerman, Pacifica corres- 
pondent in Tel Aviv, interviews 
Israeli opposition leaders, Uri Av- 
neri and Shulamit Aloni. (WBA0 



2:00 
OPERA 

ROBERT LE DIABLE 

by Meyerbeer 

Bertram — Boris Christoff 

Robert — Giorgio Merighi 

Isabelle — Renata Scotto 

Alice — Stefania Malagu 

Raimbaud — Gianfranco Mang- 
anotti 

Albert — Giovanni Antonini 

Lady-in-Waiting — Marisa 
Sansoni 

Herald — Ottavio Taddei 

Master-of-Ceremonies — 
Dino Formichini 

A Monk — Graziano del 
Vivo 

Orchestra and choir direct- 
or — Nino Sanzogno 

WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT*S 



5:30 VIEWS & REVIEWS * 
6:30 KPFA NEWS * 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



7:00 

THE WINDS OF 

THE PEOPLE 

A program commemorating the 
outbreak of the Spanish Civil 
War. Produced by Dolores de 
Vizbar. (KPFA Archives) 

8:30 

ELECTRONIC MUSIC 

With John Payne 

Bay Area composer Payne pays 
homage to the transistor with 
his Variations P-N-P (1963). This 
remarkable work predates his 
Variations N-P-N by ninety-one 
pico seconds. Neither work uti- 
lizes tones within the human 
auditory range, however the ver- 
sion which has been supplied for 
this broadcast has been sufficient- 
ly reduced in speed to provide a 
passing acquaintance with the 
original formal intentions of the 
composer. STEREO! 

9:00 

SUNDAY NIGHT 

DOCUMENTARY 

The Thin Veneer 

of Cooperation 

A special report from Pacifica 

Radio's correspondent in Saigon. 

Judy Coburn focuses on how 

the U.S. press corps in South 

Vietnam is dealt with by the 

information officers of the South 

Vietnamese government, the U.S. 

Embassy, and the U.S. military 

command. 

10:00 

STAYS FRESH LONGER 



20 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



coont>AXj 



$ 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:30 

WEEKLY MONDAY 

Charles Shere 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last Saturday's 
commentary by Father Eugene 
Boyle. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

An Eighteenth Century Concert 
for Flute and Guitar 
Rampal, flute; Bartoli, guitar 
*Odyssey 31060218 

A Selection of Shakespeare 
Sonnets 

Read by Dame Edith Evans 
Seraphim 60042 

For My True Love 

Music by Falla, Faure, 
Dowland, Scarlatti, Bach and 
others 

Almeida, guitar; Terri, mezzo- 
soprano; Ruderman, flute 
* Capitol SP 8461 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 

11:15 

NAB CONFERENCE 

Vincent Wasilewski, president of 
the National Association of Broad- 
casters, presents the major lunch- 
eon address at the organization's 
fall Conference in S.F. in Nov., 
1970. 

11:45 

HISTORY OF POLISH MUSIC 

A program presenting the young- 
est Polish contemporary compos- 
ers: Ciuciura, Mazuerk, Gorecki, 
and Schaeffer. Produced by 
Charles Boone, of the Polish 
Arts and Culture Foundation. 



1 :45 

NEWS HEADLINES 

& OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last Friday's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

With George Cleve 



WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 

5:00 BRITISH PRESS 

REVIEW 
5:15 CALENDAR OF 

EVENTS 
5:30 JUDICIAL REVIEW 
6:00 COMMENTARY 

Tom Hayden 
6:15 KPFA NEWS 
7:00 SOVIET PRESS 

& PERIODICALS 

William Mandel 

WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 




7:15 

AUDITION/EDITION 
With Richard Friedman 



•EAR*HA1D* 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Timely public affairs coverage. 



9:00 

ELLY AMELING SINGS 
SELECTIONS SHE WILL 
PERFORM WITH THE SAN 
FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 
In addition to new releases by 
Miss Ameling, we will hear the 
Exsulate Jubilate by Mozart and 
a movement from Mahler's 4th 
Symphony, which she will per- 
form here in the Bay Area with 
the San Francisco Symphony 
under Josef Krips this month. 

10:00 

WRITERS AND WRITING 

Bay Area novelists, writers and 
poets talk about their writing 
and read passages from newly 
published work. 

11:00 

THE LEGALIZATION 

OF MARIJUANA 

John Kaplan, professor of law at 
Stanford and author of the book, 
Marijuana, the New Prohibition, 
talks to the Oakland Town Meet- 
ing. He discusses the cost to 
society of the marijuana laws 
and their ineffectiveness and des- 
cribes a plan for legalization of 
the drug. 

12:00 

AFTERMATH 
MODULAR RESONANCE 
With John Schneider 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



21 




7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:45 

IN THE MORNING 

Paul Fagan 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Tom Hayden. 
8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 
The Music of Alban Berg 
Piano Sonata, Op. 1 (1904) 

Webster, piano 

'Dover HCR 7285 (13) 
Altenberg Lieder, Op. 4 (1902) 

Lukomska, soprano; 

Boulez, BBC Symphony 

'Columbia MS 7179 (11) 
Chamber Concerto for Violin, 

Piano and Thirteen Wind 

Instruments (1925) 

Gawriloff, violin; Barenboim, 

piano; Boulez, ensemble 

'Columbia MS 7179 (30) 
Three Movements from the 

"Lyric Suite," for String 

Orchestra, (1928) 

Craft, Columbia Symphony 

Columbia M2L 271 (14) 
Four Symphonic Excerpts from 

"Lulu" 

Craft, Columbia Symphony 

Columbia M2L (18) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 
11:15 

SOVIET PRESS 
& PERIODICALS 
Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram with William Mandel. 
11:30 

LABANOTATION 
Baird Searles talks about dance 
notation with Ann Hutchinson 
of the Dance Notation Bureau. 
(WBAI) 

12:00 

DE LA TIERRA 

Elsa Knight Thompson talks with 
three visitors from the Taos area 
of northern New Mexico about 



problems in their area: legal 
struggles of the Indians, the aims 
of the new Cooperative farm 
and medical clinic which the 
Hispano community is creating. 
The speakers are Al Lujan from 
the Taos Pueblo, Valentina Val- 
dez, worker in the Co-op, and 
John de Puy, an artist who has 
lived there for 20 years. 

1:00 

U.C. NOON CONCERT 

10-28-70 

Schubert: Sonata in A 
Op. 42 (D.845); 
David Percy, piano 
STEREO 

1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES & 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

CONCERT OF NEW 

RELEASES 

With George Cleve 

WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 

5:00 TO BE ANNOUNCED 
5:15 CALENDAR OF 

EVENTS 
5:30 DRAMA AND 

LITERATURE 

REVIEW 
5:45 TO BE ANNOUNCED 
6:00 COMMENTARY 

Lewis Sherman 
6:15 KPFA NEWS 

WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 



7:30 PM 

KPFB: LIVE BROADCAST OF 

BERKELEY CITY COUNCIL 

MEETING 




7:00 ELWOOD'S ARCHIVES 

The Charleston Chasers, a Red 
Nichols studio recording group 
of the late 20's of outstanding 
quality. 

7:30 THE MOVIES 

Bob Sitton talks to people 
who make them about them. 



-•EJUPJUUB*- 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Documentaries, discussions and 
special reports. 

9:00 

RICHARD RUSH 

DIRECTOR 

Margo Skinner and Alan Farley 
interview the director of Getting 
Straight. 

10:00 

CPE LECTURE 

William Hinton: 

"The Cultural Revolution 

in China" 

The author of Fanshen, a book 

based on his 7 years in China 

from 1946-1953, speaks to a 

U.C. Berkeley, audience on Dec. 

3, 1970. 

11:15 

CONTEMPORARY MUSIC 

If In Is by Charles Amirkhan- 
ian. Now leaving the air, 
dumbwaiter, filter hamper 
rubber, stun mum, KNOX 
chubby, chedule hitter 
tereo ix.' 
STEREO 

Bending Moment by Richard 
Friedman. Presenting a 
tribute to Young, his Modu- 
lus, and the Essential Prim- 
itive Torque of the Universe. 
STEREO 

"Not So, Gnazzo!" As we re- 
ported, A.J. Gnazzo, inter- 
media artist, war corres- 
pondent, and general man 
about town, was only hiding. 
Here he is again, marking his 
return to radio with another 
important message. Free 
emission standing wave 
ratio or your money back. 
STEREO 
12:00 

♦INSIDE ON THE OUTSIDE 
DeLeon Harrison 

KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



co e^> rae st> xc| 



to 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:45 

METAPHYSICAL 
IN THE MORNING MIX 
Jim Emdy 
8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Lewis Sherman. 
8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 
J.S. Bach: Cantata No. 187, "Es 

warter auf Dich" 

Reichelt, soprano; 

Hudemann, bass; Doormann, 

conductor 

CantateT72 019 L (26) 
Ravel : L 'enfant et les Sortileges 

Cuenod, tenor; Geneva Choir; 

Ansermet, Suisse Romande 

Orchestra 

Richmond R 23086 (42) 
Jan Pusina: Sand (1970) 

Electronic music 

KPFA tape (20)* 
Pusina is a composer living in 
Berkeley. 
10:45 

MORNING READING 
The Anything Box, an antho/ogy 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 
11:15 

AN AMERICAN 
JEWISH ALTERNATIVE 
TO ZIONISM 

Colin Edwards interviews Rabbi 
Elmer Berger, who helped to 
found the American Council for 
Judaism in 1943 and he has 
written several books on Judaism 
and on the situation in the Middle 
East. 
12:00 

U.C. NOON CONCERT - 
LIVE 

Orchestra Concert. 
Michael Senturia conducts music 
by Mozart. 
1:00 

BUDDENBROOKS 
Chapter 1 of Thomas Mann's 
novel, read by Alexander Scour- 
by with an introduction by Mann. 
(KPFA Archives) 



1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES 

&OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

With George Cleve 

WHAT'S HAPPENING # WHAT'§ 

5:00 JAPANESE PRESS 

REVIEW 
5:15 CALENDAR OF 

EVENTS 
5:30 BAY AREA 

INSTITUTE 
6:00 COMMENTARY 

Cy Schoenfield 
6:15 KPFA NEWS 
WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'I 




7:00 

ODE TO GRAVITY 

With Charles Amirkhanian 

BON BONN BON. A rebroad- 
cast of the program first heard 
on Dec. 16, 1970, the 200th 
anniversary of the birth of 
Ludwig van Beethoven. Pro- 
duced by Charles Amirkhanian 
and Richard Friedman, and intro- 
ducing the Harvey Shaw Ensemble 
of Florida in their West Coast 
premiere broadcast. 



•EAR*RAID* 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR: 
THE PACIFICA 
FILM FESTIVAL 

Bob Sitton hosts a program on 
the Pacifica Film Festival, which 
opens tomorrow night at the 
M.H. deYoung Museum. The 
Festival is presented as a con- 
tinuing benefit for KPFA and 
comprises a series of Thursday 
night and Saturday afternoon 
performances of some of the 
best films of today and yester- 
year. 



9:00 

THE WHIMPERING 

DISC JOCKEY 

A program of assorted musics 
presented by Warren Van Orden, 
George Cleve, Richard Friedman, 
and Charles Amirkhanian, who 
will spin and sputter all evening. 
Previews of upcoming features 
on KPFA including a new six- 
hour work by Karlheinz Stock - 
hausen just received from West 
German Radio. 

12:00 

MIDNIGHT COUNTRY 

With Paul Rude and Bob Kridle.. 
Live and recorded backwoods 
repertoire. No commercials. 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



23 




II 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:45 

METAPHYSICAL 

IN THE MORNING MIX 

Jim Emdy 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of lasl night's com- 
mentary by Cy Schoenfield. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

The Art of Glenn Gould 

J.S. Bach: Piano Concerto No. 4 

in A major BWV 1 055 

with Golschmann, Columbia 

Symphony 

'Columbia MS 7294 (14) 
Beethoven: Eroica Variations, 

Op. 35 

'Columbia M 3008 (28) 
Scriabin: Sonata No. 3 in F-sharp 

minor. Op. 23 
Schoenberg: Piano Concerto, 

Op. 42 

with Craft, CBC Symphony 

Orchestra 

'Columbia MS 7039 (20) 



10:45 

MORNING READING 

The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 

11:15 

THE REPRESSION 

IN QUEBEC 

Phil Courneyeur, a journalist and 
a member of the central commit- 
tee of the Socialist Workers Lea- 
gue in Quebec, tells Bill North- 
wood of KPFA about the pol- 
itical context of the repression in 
Canada, and of the political and 
social consequences he thinks it 
will have. 



12:15 

VIENNA FESTIVAL 1970 

Beethoven : Missa Solemnis 
Lipt, soprano, Reynolds, 
contralto; Schrier, tenor; 
Berry, bass; Josef Krips, 
Vienna Philharmonic 
Austrian Radio 

1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

CONCERT OF 
NEW RELEASES 
With George Cleve 

WHAT'S HAPPENING # WHAT'S 
5:00 MUSIC REVIEW 

Charles Amirkhanian 
5:15 CALENDAR OF 

EVENTS 
5:30 CAVEAT EMPTOR 
6:00 COMMENTARY 

Sidney Roger 
6:15 KPFA NEWS 

WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 




7:00 

MUSIC IN AMERICA 

Chris Strachwitz 

'EAR-RAID* 




8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Timely public affairs coverage. 

9:00 

GEORGE CARLIN: 

COMEDIAN IN TRANSITION 

The young comedian talks about 
his transition from stand-up com- 
ic to social satirist. The inter- 
viewer is Alan Farley. 

9:30 

ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION 

New Directions Community 

School 

Bob Morris of KPFA talks to 
the students and teachers who 
are the "family" at this free high 
school in Richmond. 

10:30 

(FOR YOUNG MEN) 

WARNING: 

THE DRAFT 

MAY BE DANGEROUS 

TO YOUR HEALTH 

11:00 
SPECTRUM 

Through a conversation with Dr. 
Norman Thrower, a geographer 
from U.C.L.A., and a number of 
readings and illustrations, Carlos 
Hagen comments on the contrast 
between American and European 
urban planning, the crisis in 
housing and population, and the 
destruction of the natural en- 
vironment that is taking place 
every day in America. (KPFK) 

12:00 

AFTERMATH 
Jeff Echeverria. 



"No Man's Land" is 
featured tonight at the 
Pacifica Film Festival. 



24 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



pRlD3LCJ 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:45 

FRIDAY MORNING 94.1 

Denny Smithson 

8:30 . 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Sidney Roger. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Music of Alan Hovhaness 
Khaldis, a concerto for piano, 4 

trumpets and percussion 

Masselos, piano; Solomon, 

ensemble 

KPFA tape (20) 
Anahid, fantasy for Orchestra, 

Op. 57 

Surinach, MGM Orchestra 

KPFA tape (15) 
Suite from "The Flowering 

Peach" 

Hovhaness, ensemble 

KPFA tape (19) 
Symphony No. 4 

Roller, Eastman Wind Ens. 

Mercury MG 50366 (21) 
Symphony No. 15, Op. 199 

("Silver Pilgrimage ") 

Whitney, Louisville Orchestra 

*LS-622 (21) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 

11:15 

THE OVERPOPULATION 

FALLACY 

Giuseppe Slater and Paul Kangas, 
authors of the pamphlet "The 
Earth Belongs to the People" 
talks to KPFA's Paul Rude about 
how exploitation of the world's 
resources by a minority cause 
pollution, hunger, and overcrowd- 
ing. They criticize the arguments 
of Paul Ehrlich, author of The 
Population Bomb. 



12:15 

DUTCH COMPOSERS 

OF THE 

20TH CENTURY - I 

Willem Pijper: Symphonic 
Epigrams; Bernard Haitink, 
Amsterdam Concertgebouw 
Orchestra 

Henk Badings: Symphony 
No. 10; Jean Fournet, 
Rotterdam Philharmonic 
Orchestra 

12:45 

ON "BOOKS" 

Thomas Parkinson offers a criti- 
cal evaluation of the poetry of 
Kenneth Rexroth. 

1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

With George Cleve 



WHAT'S HAPPENING»WHAT'S 

* * 

* 5:00 ON FILM * 
! Bob Sitton 



EVENTS 



* 5:15 CALENDAR OF 

* 

* 5:30 CONSUMER • 

* PROTECTION * 

* 5:45 REPORT TO THE I 

* LISTENER * 

* Al Silbowitz * 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY • 

Bruce Franklin * 



• 6:15 KPFA NEWS 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 




7:00 

SOUNDS OF AFRICA 

With KPFA's 

Sam Oni 



•EAR-RAID' 



12 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Discussions, documentaries and 
special reports. 

9:00 

ON STAGE 

THE SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL 
A play by R.B. Sheridan with 
Ralph Richardson, John Gielgud, 
Geraldine Ewan, Gwen Ffrang- 
con-Davies, Meriel Forbes and 
Laurence Naismith. Directed by 
John Gielgud. 

11:00 

THE GOVERNMENT VS. 

THE BROADCASTERS 

Excerpts of V-P Agnew's speeches 
on the media given in Nov., 1969 
and Alan Farley reading the ad- 
dress given by Richard S. Salant, 
Pres. of CBS News, to the Tennes- 
see Assoc, of Broadcasters in 
Oct., 1970. 

12:00 

INFORMATION TRANS- 
MISSION, MODULATION 
AND NOISE 
Richard Friedman 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



25 



SAXZCIR&2LCI 



13 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

8:45 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Bruce Franklin. 

9:00 

MORNING CONCERT 

Kodaly: Hary Janos 
Ustinov, narrator; 
Hungarian State Opera; 
Edinburgh Festival Choir; 
Kertesz, London Sym- 
phony Orchestra 
'London OSA 1278 (97) 

11:00 

CHILDREN'S 
BOOK SAMPLER 
Ellyn Beatty 

11:15 

THE CASE OF 

THE OAK PARK FOUR 

The Oak Park Four are young 
black activists who have been 
charged with conspiracy and mur- 
der in the killing of a police of- 
ficer in the Oak Park District 
of Sacramento last May. Kirk 
Smith, KPFA's man in Sacto., 
talks with 3 members of their 
defense in the trial which began 
in Dec. We hear Robin Yeamans 
attorney; and Fred Foote and 
Howard Humphrey of the"ir Le- 
gal Defense Fund. 

12:30 

BOOKS 

With Kenneth Rexroth 

1:00 

MUSIC OF THE 

WORLD'S PEOPLE 

Miscellaneous selections of ethnic 
music. Produced by the late 
Henry Cowell (WBAI Archives). 

1:30 

PUBLIC LANDS - 
ONE-THIRD OF A NATION 
Panel No. 2 

Walter Mead of U.C. Santa Bar- 
bara; Brock Evans of the Sierra 
Club; George Ketchum of Western 
26 



Oil and Gas Ass.; Carl Stolten- 
berg of the School of Forestry 
at Oregon State Univ.; and Frank 
Hortig, Division of Lands, State 
of Calif.; discuss the policy rec- 
ommendations of the Commis- 
sion for the Use of the Public 
Lands at the Western Regional 
Conference held in S.F. on Dec. 
7 & 8, 1970. The moderator is 
John Zivnuska, Dean of the 
School of Forestry and Conserva- 
tion, U.C, Berkeley. 
2:45 

THE OPERA CLUB 
KPFA critics and operaphiles 
Carol Barclay, MelvinJahn, Allan 
Ulrich and William Collins and 
assorted friends of various vocal 
persuasions present an informal 
program of operatic news, pre- 
views, and reviews. Including a 
discussion of the recent lecture 
given in San Francisco given by 
Rudolf Bing, outgoing General 
Manager of the Metropolitan 
Opera. Plus a preview of Spring 
Opera in San Francisco. 

4:30 

GOLDEN VOICES 

With Anthony Boucher 

No. 704 Lucy Isabelle Marsh, 
soprano 

5:00 

ASIA IN THE 
SEVENTIES - NEW 
PROBLEMS, NEW 
PERSPECTIVES 
Dr. Haydn Williams, President of 
the Asia Foundation and for five 
years Deputy Assistant Secretary 
of Defense, gives the keynote ad- 
dress for a series of seven pro- 
grams on "The New Asia," 
sponsored by the World Affairs 
Council of Northern California. 

WHATS HAPPENING*WHAT*S 



* 6:00 COMMENTARY 

• 6:30 KPFA NEWS 



WHATS HAPPENING # WHAT*S 



7:00 

S.F. CHAMBER MUSIC 

SOCIETY CONCERT 

Telemann: Pimpinone, 

opera buffo 
Mozart: Chamber Concerto 

for Piano and Strings in A 

K. 414 
LeClair: Sonata for Violin 

and Harpsichord in D 
Lo ca te 1 1 i : Trio Sona ta for 

Two Violins and Continuo 

in G 
Francesca Howe, soprano 
Walter Matthes, baritone 
Kenneth Goldsmith, violin 
Anne Crowden, violin 
Asbjorn Finness, biola 
Sally Kell, cello 
Donald Pippin, harpsichord 

and piano 

9:00 

RAMSEY CLARK 

ON LAW AND ORDER 

From a conference on criminal 
justice sponsored by John Jay 
College. Recorded in N.Y., 
Nov. 10, 1970. WBAI. 

9:30 

"THE SOUL OF THE 

WHITE ANT" 

A story by Eugene Marais. A 
dramatization and recreation of 
the Transvaal classic study of 
insect psychology. With music 
by Stephen O'Reiley. (Broad- 
casting Foundation of America). 

10:30 

HUEY NEWTON 

AT OAKLAND TECHNICAL 

HIGH SCHOOL 

Black Panther Party Founder and 
Minister of Defense Huey P. 
Newton speaks to a group of 
students at his Alma Mater. 



12:00 

THE HERCULES 

GRYTPYPE-THYNNE 

SHOW 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 




14 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

8:30 

MORNING CONCERT 

A Recital by Joseph Szigeti and 
Beta Bartok 

Beethoven: Sonata in A, Op. 47 

("Kreutzer") 
Bartok : Rhapsodie No. 1 
Debussy: Sonata No. 3 in G 

minor 
Bartok : Sonata No. 2 

Vanguard 2 - Van 1130/1 

10:00 

THEWAYLESSWAY: 
A MEDITATION BEING 
With Jack Gariss 

11:00 

JAZZ, BLUES AND 

PHIL ELWOOD 

Presenting a full playing of 
the "Seven Ages of Jazz" con- 
cert from the Oakdale Musical 
Theatre, Wallingford, Conn., 
September 26, 1958. Featured 
artists — Coleman Hawkins, 
Billie Holiday, Willie "The 
Lion" Smith, Brownie Mc- 
Ghee, and many others. 

1:00 

AN ISRAELI PACIFIST 

El6a Knight Thompson talks with 
Uriel Davis, a native of Israel and 
heavily involved in radical and 
pacifist activities there. 

2:00 

OPERATIC SNITS 

AND OTHER CONCEITS 

Being a miscellaneous collection 
of those rages indulged in by 
Prima Donnas and other wild 
beasts. Included will be one or 
two surprise snits not planned by 
the composer and librettist. Pre- 
sented by Melvin Jahn with fear 
and trembling. 

(This program is postponed from 
January.) 



WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 



5:30 VIEWS & REVIEWS 
6:30 KPFA NEWS 



WHAT'S HAPPEN I NG # WHAT'S 

7:00 

LEE STRASBERG OF THE 
NEW YORK ACTOR'S 
STUDIO - I 

Bob Adler of WBAI talks with 
Lee Strasberg of the N.Y. Actor's 
Studio about the methods of 
teaching acting. 

8:00 

A LEISURELY TOUR 

THROUGH KEYBOARD 

LITERATURE 

With pianist Julian White 



9:00 

SUNDAY NIGHT 

DOCUMENTARY 

Ten Years of Struggle 

A program celebrating the 10th 
anniversary of the NLF. The 
complete Manifesto and an out- 
line of the 10-Point Program of 
the NLF are presented along 
with a history of the struggle 
of the Vietnamese people against 
the American forces. (KPFK) 

10:00 

STAYS FRESH FOUR WAYS 

A four-channel program high- 
lighted by a tape of the Incredible 
String Band in concert at Pepper- 
land in San Rafael last Fall. 
Followed by a four-channel re- 
cording of the electronic music 
piece Touch by Morton Subot- 
nick. Two of the channels of this 
program will be broadcast over 
KPFA, and the other two over 
KSFX (103.7FM). Tune one 
stereo radio to us, and the other 
to KSFX, and enjoy the pro- 
gram. 




KPFA Christmas Fair - 1970 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



27 



CIQOn^>2LC| 



19 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last Saturday's 
commentary. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

The Begger's Opera by John Gay 
With the Authentick, Compleat 
and Original Songs and Selected 
Text to Which is Prefixed the 
Overture Composed by Dr. Pep- 
usch. Newly Realized with the 
Original Instrumentation and Con- 
ducted by Max Goberman. 
'Everest 3127/2 (88) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 

11:15 

SCAN LAN'S 
"SUPPRESSED ISSUE" 

Warren Hinckle, the editor of 
Scanlan's Monthly, tells Elsa 
Knight Thompson about, among 
other things, the seizure, release 
and re-seizure of the last issue 
of the controversial magazine. 
The issue in question is about 
Geurilla Warfare in the U.S.A. 



12:00 

POLISH MUSIC 

Karol Kurpinski's Szarlatan, and 
overtures to his operas Two Huts, 
The Ruins of Babylon, and Jad- 
wiga, Queen of Poland. Presented 
by Wanda Tomczykowska, pres. 
of the Polish Arts and Culture 
Foundation. 

1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES 

& OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last Friday's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

with George Cleve 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 

5:00 BRITISH PRESS 

REVIEW 
5:15 CALENDAR OF 

EVENTS 
5:30 CONFRONTATION: 

WASHINGTON 
6:00 COMMENTARY 

Mike Culbert 
6:15 KPFA NEWS 
7:00 SOVIET PRESS 

& PERIODICALS 

William Mandel 

WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 




7:15 

AUDITION/EDITION 
With Richard Friedman 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Timely public affairs coverage. 

9:00 

THE RECORDED ART 

OF SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 

Ravel: Mother Goose Suite 
Stravi nsky : Capriccio 
Ravel: Daphnis and Chloe 

Suite 
Prepared and produced by Larry 
Jackson. 
10:00 

WRITERS And writing 
David Gitin introduces a reading 
of poems by William Carlos 
Williams, given at the University 
of California, May 1955. Williams 
reads from Spring & All and also 
later work including The Descent. 
11:00 

LAW AND LAW AND ORDER 
A forum including Paul Chevigny 
(author of Police Power), Mary 
Kaufman of the National Lawyers 
Guild, Heywood Burns of the 
National Council of Black Law- 
yers. The topics include the 
infiltration of radical groups by 
informers, the role of an attor- 
ney at a political trial, and the 
lawlessness of those whose job it 
is to uphold the law. (WBAI) 

12:00 

AFTERMATH 
MODULAR RESONANCE 
with John Schneider 



•EAR*RAID*> 



28 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 




l£> 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:45 

IN THE MORNING 

Paul Fagan 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Mike Culbert. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Scarlatti: Twenty Harpsi- 
chord Sonatas; Wanda 
Landowska, harpsichord 
Great Recordings of the 
Century COLH 73 (48) 

Chopin: Waltzes (complete) 
Dinu Lipatti, piano 
Odyssey 32 16 0057 (49) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 

11:15 

SOVIET PRESS & 

PERIODICALS 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram with William Mandel. 

11:30 

THREE SATANIC 

INTERLUDES 

Dr. Walter Kaufman, Princeton 
philosopher, with the help of 
Dennis O'Brien, reads 3 excerpts 
from his book. Critique of Reli- 
gion and Philosophy (KPFA Ar- 
chives) 



8:30 AM 

KPFB: LIVE BROADCAST OF 

BERKELEY CITY COUNCIL 

MEETING 



12:45 

LAW AND ORDER 

IN THE 70s 

Hans Mattick, Co-Director of the 
Center for Studies in Criminal 
Justice at the U. of Chi. talks 
about crime and social change 
in the coming 10 years. Don 
Sullivan, Asst. Day Editor for 
Chicago Today, asks about a 
range of topics from the death 
penalty to the generation gap. 
(CONVERSATIONS AT CHICA- 
GO) 

1:15 

DUTCH COMPOSERS OF 

THE 20TH CENTURY 

Oscar Van Hemel: Serenata for 
strings and woodwind trio 
Hilversum Radio Chamber Or. 
Conductor: Henk Spruit 

Peter Schat: Mosaics for 
orchestra 

Hilversum Radio Chamber Or. 
Conductor: Francis Travis 

1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES 

& OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

CONCERT OF 

NEW RELEASES 

with Pat Blake 

Publicity Director 

of the San Francisco Opera 



WHAT'S HAPPENING # WHAT'S 
5:00 TO BE ANNOUNCED 
5:15 CALENDAR OF 

EVENTS 
5:30 DRAMA AND 

LITERATURE 

REVIEW 
5:45 TO BE ANNOUNCED 
6:00 COMMENTARY 

Bob Fitch 
6:15 KPFA NEWS 

WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 




7:00 ELWOOD'S ARCHIVES 

Pianist Art Tatum in a series 
of his less known solos. 

7:30 

FILM REVIEW 

Margo Skinner 



•EAR-RAID'" 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Documentaries, discussions and 
special reports. 

9:00 

AVANT GARDE WEST 

Bob Sitton talks with representa- 
tives of the West Coast avant-garde 
school of film-making. 

9:30 

WHO CONTROLS 

THE POLICE? 

A panel discussion with Berkeley 
City Councilmen Borden Price 
and Warren Widener, criminology 
prof. Anthony Piatt of U.C., Berk, 
and 4 parent members of the 
PTA. The moderator is Carol 
Sibley of the Berkeley School 
Board. The panel was held 
Dec. 8, 1970, sponsored by the 
Committee on Juvenile Justice 
of the Berkeley PTA. 

10:45 

THE NOVEL 
IN THE AGE 
OF SCIENCE 

A recorded address by novelist 
Gore Vidal, presented at Merritt 
College in Oakland. (KPFA 
Archives) 

12:00 

•INSIDE ON THE OUTSIDE 

DeLeon Harrison 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



29 



co eT> rae s^> axj 



17 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news 

7:45 

METAPHYSICAL 

IN THE MORNING MIX 

Jim Emdy 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Bob Fitch. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Tansman: Suite in Modo 
Polonico 
Segoyia, guitar 
*Decca DL 710112 (25) 

Wagner: Die Walkure — Act I, 
Scene 3, Traubel, Melchoir 
(26) 

Ride of the Valkyries (5) 
Siegfried - Forest Murmurs 
Die Gotterdammerung — 
Siegfried's Funeral Music ( 1 4) 
Toscanini, NBC Symphony 
*Victrola VICS-1316 (e) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 

11:15 

CAN TECHNOLOGY 

BE NEUTRAL? 

American industry abroad is the 
3rd largest economy in the world. 
It was helped into position by 
the multi-national corporation, 
a comparatively recent business 
entity that manages business opera- 
tions in different sovereign na- 
tions, with private capital. Neil 
Jacoby, former Dean of the Grad- 
uate School of BA at UCLA, 
assesses the role of the multi- 
national corporation in interna- 
tional corporation in internation- 
al relations. (Center for the Study 
of Democratic Institutions) 



30 



12:00 

U.C. NOON CONCERT - 

LIVE 

Music by students of Composition 
Seminar. 

1:00 
SPAIN'S POET 

A selection of Spanish poetry 
read by Hugo Carrillo. (KPFA 
Archives) 

1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES 

& OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

With George Cleve 



WHAT'S HAPPENING # WHAT'§ 
5:00 GERMAN PRESS 

REVIEW 

Helga Lohr-Bailey 
5:15 CALENDAR OF 

EVENTS 
5:30 BAY AREA 

INSTITUTE 
6:00 COMMENTARY 

Cy Schoenfield 
6:15 KPFA NEWS 
WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 




7:00 

ODE TO GRAVITY 

with Charles Amirkhanian 

Another hour in this weekly 
series presented by the Society 
for the Abolition of American 
Disc Jockeys (SAADJ), Berkeley 
Chapter No. 94 1/10. 
i . r . 




11:00 
McCLOSKY'S GOT 
A BRAN NEW BAG 

12:00 

CLASSICAL MUSIC 
AT MIDNIGHT 
Michael Dutko 




Andres Segovia and George Cleve, KPFA Morning 
Concert Host, during a recent collaboration. 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 




is 



"Oedipus Rex" 

7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:45 

METAPHYSICAL 

IN THE MORNING MIX 

Jim Emdy 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Cy Schoenfield. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Respighi : Ancient Airs and 

Dances for Lute 

Ferrara, Rome Symphony 

Orchestra 

*Everest3185 (44) 
Kirchner: Quartet No. 3 for 

Strings and Electronic Tape 

Beaux-Arts Quartet 

"Columbia MS 7284 (17) 
Vaughan Williams: Symphony 

No. 9 in E minor 

Boult, London Philharmonic 

Orchestra 

'Everest LPBR-6006 (34) 



10:45 

MORNING READING 

The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 

11:15 

A.B. 22 AND THE EFFECT 

OF PROTECTIVE 

LEGISLATION 

KPFA Volunteer Joan Churton 
talks first with B.J. Miller of the 
Fair Employment Practices Com- 
mission about the effect of AB. 22 
(which forbids job discrimination 
by sex), and then with Hazel 
Hill and Marge Hart of Women, 
Inc. 

12:15 

WAS HOMER AN 

ILLITERATE 

IMPROVISOR? 

An address by Douglas Young, 
Scotch translator and poet. (KUT) 

KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



is featured tonight at the Pacifica Film Festival. 



1:15 

THE RECORDED ART 

OF FYODOR SHALYAPIN 

Larry Jackson continues his ser- 
ies on the great Russian bass 
with a program of songs by 
Schubert, Dargomyzhsky, Mu- 
sorgsky and others. 

1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES 
F.Y.I. 
3:00 

CONCERT OF NEW 
RELEASES 
With George Cleve 
WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 



5:00 MUSIC REVIEW 

Charles Amirkhanian 

5:15 CALENDAR OF 

EVENTS 
5:30 MILITARY 

MONITOR 
6:00 COMMENTARY 

Robert Pickus 
6:15 KPFA NEWS 



WHAT'S HAPPENING *WHAT'S 




7:00 

VARIOUS FOLK 

Larry Bartlett 

•EAK'ftAID* 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR: 

TIME TO LISTEN 

Live broadcast of a public fo- 
rum on an issue of concern in 
the Berkeley community, co-spon- 
sored by KPFA, the League of 
Women Voters, and the Berkeley 
Gazette. 
10:00 

TELEPHONE INTERACTION 
27NOV70 - 
Richard Friedman with 
Tony Gnazzo 

Tony reads one of his "Mani- 
folds" over the phone and Ri- 
chard reads a poem by Jackson 
MacLow. They also talk of 
many things. From a recent 
Aftermath of Indeterminism. 

10:30 

(FOR YOUNG MEN) 

WARNING: 

THE DRAFT 

MAY BE DANGEROUS 

TO YOUR HEALTH 

11:00 
SPECTRUM 

Jn this program, Carlos Hagen 
comments on the conflict be- 
tween sedentary life and the very 
nomadic, roving life of a large 
segment of the American popu- 
lation. The program includes a 
number of musical illustrations 
on this topic. (KPFK) 

12:00 

AFTERMATH 
Jeff Echeverria 




Composer Tony Gnazzo (c. 1937) 



31 



TTUID3LCJ 



7:00 
KPFANEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:45 

FRIDAY MORNING 94.1 

Denny Smithson 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Robert Pickus. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Vivaldi: Juditha Triumphans 
Oratorio, Oralia Dominquez, 
Irene Companez, Maria Grazia 
Allegri, Biance Maria Casoni, 
Emilia Cundari 
Chorus of the Philharmonic 
Academy of Rome/Angelicum 
Mailand-Alberto Zedda, direc- 
tor 

*Victrola VICS-6016 
10:45 

MORNING READING 
The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 



11:15 

DUTCH COMPOSERS OF 

THE 20TH CENTURY 



11:45 

THE E.T. EARL LECTURES 

Professor Paul Louis Lehmann of 
the Union Theological Seminary, 
"New Testament Paradigms of 
Revolutionary Action." 



19 



12:45 

AR CONTEMPORARY 

MUSIC PROJECT XIV 

Richard Hoffman: Orchestra 
Piece 1961; Robert 
Baustian; Oberlin College 
Conservatory Orchestra 

1:15 

THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY 

OF ALICE B.TOKLAS 

by Gertrude Stein, read by Alice 
B. Toklas. 

1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

with George Cleve 

WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



5:00 ON FILM 

Bob Sitton 
5:15 CALENDAR OF 

EVENTS 
5:30 ECOLOGY & 

POLITICS 

Keith Murray 
5:45 TO BE ANNOUNCED 
6:00 COMMENTARY 

Robert Tideman 
6:15 KPFA NEWS 



WHAT'S HAPPENING»WHAT*S 




7:00 

JURA-PARIS ROAD 

Charles Shere 



•EAirHAID*" 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Discussions, documentaries and 
special reports. 

9:00 

ON STAGE: 

CA ESA R AND CLEOPA TRA 
By Bernard Shaw. With Claire 
Bloom, Max Adrian and Dame 
Judith Anderson. Directed by 
Anthony Quayle. 

10:30 

CHORAL MUSIC 

OF ARNOLD SCHOENBERG 

Fred Schmitt presents a selection 
of music performed mostly by 
the Greg Smith Singers. We 
hear Six German Folk Songs, 
Friede Auf Erden, Drimal Tau- 
sand Jahre, De Profundi's, Four 
Pieces for Mixed Choir, Three 
Satires for Mixed Choir. Also 
Six Pieces for Male Chorus sung 
by the John Alden Choir. 

12:30 

INFORMATION TRANS- 
MISSION, MODULATION 
AND NOISE 
Richard Friedman 



Women's History Research Center, Inc. 
2325 Oak, Berkeley, Ca. 94708 

Send self addressed stamped 
envelope for literature list 

Phoire: 524-7772 



32 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 




20 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

8:45 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Robert Tideman. 

9:00 

MORNING CONCERT 

Blow: An Ode on the Death 

of Mr. Henry Purcell 

Oberlin, Bressler-counter- 

tenors; Greeberg, Pro 

Musica Antiqua 

Esoteric ES-519 (19) 
Mayazumi: "Samsara" 

Symphonic Poem 

Ozawa, Orchestra of 

Radio Japan 

KPFA Tape (26) 
Chopin: Polonaise-Fantaisie 

Ballade No. 4. Two 

Etudes 
Debussy : Estampes 
Scriabin: Sonata No. 5 

Richter, piano 

DGG LPM 18 (54) 

11:00 

CHILDREN'S BOOK 
SAMPLER 
Ellyn Beatty 

11:15 

ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION 

Education Switchboard 

Meeting 

Each Monday night, the Education 
Switchboard holds an open meet- 
ing (Project One Building, 10th & 
Howard, SF) to discuss matters 
relating to free schools in the 
Bay Area. At this meeting 
they are discussing hiring for 
schools, finding teachers for a 
free high school on the penin- 
sula, switchboard activities, etc. 

12:00 

REMINISCENCES 
OF A REBEL 
Ben Legere 

12:30 

BOOKS 

with Kenneth Rexroth 

KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



1:00 

MUSIC OF THE 

WORLD'S PEOPLE 

Miscellaneous selections of ethnic 
music. 

1:30 

PUBLIC LANDS - 
ONE-THIRD OF A NATION 
Panel No. 3 

This panel deals with the land 
problems of Alaska and of the 
Native Americans there — from 
the Western Regional Conference 
on the Report of the Public 
Land Law Commission. The 
main presentation is by George 
Rogers of the Univ. of Alaska. 
Scheduled panel members: John 
Porbridge, Joseph Fitzgerald, Eu- 
gene Guess, and Robert Weedin. 
American Indian discussants: Mi- 
chael Rogers, Rokey Dwanas 
and Helen Mitchell. The modera- 
tor is A. Starker Leopold, zoo- 
logist and conservationist of UC 
Berkeley. 

3:30 
THIN AIR 

A program highlighting cultural 
events in the. Bay Area and pre- 
senting a variety of artists who 
visit the KPFA studios. 

4:30 

GOLDEN VOICES 

with Anthony Boucher 

5:00 

MUSIC OF THE 

ITALIAN MASTERS 

Ariosti: Lezione No. 5; Emil 
Seiler, viola d'amore, with 
viola da gamba, lute and 
• harpsichord 

Gesualdo: Luci serene e 
chiare; Ecco moriro; Ahi, 
gia mi discoloro; Invan 
dunque, o crudele: Itene 
o miei sospiri; Mentre ma- 
donna il lasso fianco posa; 
Ah, troppo saggia ne I'erra 
(Madrigals) Randolph 
Singers 

Respighi: Rossiniana; 
Berlin State Opera 
Orchestra; Hans Stein- 
kopf , conductor 



WHAT'S HAPPENING # WHAT'S 

* 
* 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY 

* Henry Anderson 

* 6:30 KPFA NEWS 



WHAT'S HAPPENING *WHAT'S 

7:00 

NATIONAL VETERANS' 
INQUIRY INTO 
U.S. WAR CRIMES 
POLICY 

Testimony given by Vietnam vet- 
erans on the first day of the 
Inquiry, which was organized by 
anti-war Gl's and veterans and 
was held at the Dupont Plaza 
Hotel in Washington, DC on Dec. I, 
1970. The program is intro- 
duced by Steve Bookshester of 
Pacifica's Washington Bureau. 

8:00 

ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION 

Community High School 

Bob Morris of KPFA talks to 
Simone Palmer and David Good- 
win (students) and Brice Todd 
(teacher) about Community High 
School, a liberally structured add- 
ition to Berkeley High. 

9:00 

BENNETT TARSHISH 

PRESENTS FRANZ SCHMIDT 

II 

A complete performance of The 
Book of the Seven Seals. This 
is Schmidt's masterpiece, written 
at the end of his life (1938). A 
strange and overwhelming work. 

11:15 

TO BE ANNOUNCED 

12:00 
AFTERMATH 

All-night jazz with Bert Thomas. 



33 



uot>axj 



21 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news 

8:30 

MORNING CONCERT 

Great Recordings of the 

Century (Part 1) 

J.S.Bach: Chromatic Fantasy 

and Fugue in D Minor 

Edwin Fischer, piano 

Seraphim IC-6045 (12) 
Mendelssohn: Trio No. 1 in 

D Minor; Jacques Thibaud, 

violin; Pablo Casals, cello; 

Alfred Cortot, piano 

Seraphim IC-6044 
Beethoven: Sonata No. 30 

in E Major, Op. 101; 

Dame Myra Hess, piano 

Seraphim IC-6045 (21) 

10:00 

THE WAYLESSWAY: 
A MEDITATION BEING 
with Jack Gariss 

11:00 

JAZZ, BLUES AND 

PHIL ELWOOD 

1:00 

ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION 

Bay Area Radical 

Teachers Organizing Collective 

Bob Morris of KPFA talks to 
Jane and Jim, two members of 
BARTOC, a movement for cre- 
ating a greater consciousness of 
the conditions in the schools 
today. 



2:00 

THESUPERART 

With Superhost Michael Barclay 

"Leonie Rysanek — Yesterday, 
Today and Tomorrow" 
We take a short, hard look at one 
of opera's enduring phenomenons 
— the Viennese, San Franciscan, 
New York dramatic soprano— 
Leonie Rysanek, who is perhaps 
in her own way even more con- 
troversial than Callas whom she 
constantly replaced in the late 
1950's. This artist whose techni- 
cal problems with pitch and 
production are legendary has 
triumphed around the world as 
the heroines of Wagner, Verdi 
and Strauss' greatest works. Her 
magnetism is so personally potent 
that it is nearly impossible to 
present her in our strictly aural 
medium, but if anyone can do it 
perhaps S.H. can. Arthur Regan, 
of Berkeley and San Jose State, 
helps out the Superfans as he 
attempts to converse with Super- 
host in an interview suggested by 
KPFA listeners. Fabulous! 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 

# * 

♦ * 

* 5:30 VIEWS & REVIEWS * 



6:30 KPFA NEWS 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT*S 



C A N Y O 


N 


THURSDAY NIGHT SHOWINGS 


OF 


INDEPENDENT FILMS. 


OPEN SCREENING AFTERWARDS 


c 


1 N E M A 


J 


J00 CHESTNUT ST., S.F. 
332-1514 




T 


HEQU 


E 



7:00 

LEE STRASBERG 
AND THE NEW YORK 
ACTOR'S STUDIO 
Part II 

Focuses on the actor's unit of 
the studio. Lee Strasberg, direc- 
tor of the Actor's Studio, dis- 
cusses with the actors a scene 
they have performed. 

8:30 

EYEWITNESS VIETNAM: 

A MIDDLE CLASS VIEW 

Howard Kotlis, now an account- 
ant, spent a year in Vietnam in 
the infantry. In this conversa- 
tion with Bill Schechner he de- 
scribes the war from his vantage 
point — probably shared by thou- 
sands of returnees. (WBAI) 
9:00 

SUNDAY NIGHT 
DOCUMENTARY 
TEN YEARS 
OF STRUGGLE 
Part II 

A description of the Tet Offen- 
sive of 1968 and the founding 
and organization of the Provi- 
sional Revolutionary Government. 
Produced by Dennis Levitt and 
Linda Gage of KPFK. 

10:00 

FOUR CHANNEL BROADCAST 

Another rousing concert by the 
Oakland Symphony Orchestra, 
under the direction of Gerhard 
Samuel. From May 1970 a per- 
formance of Rameau's Hippolyte 
et Aricie (excerpts) and Pender- 
ecki's Dies Irae for orchestra, 
chorus, soprano, tenor and bass. 
The latter is heard in its west 
coast premiere performance with 
Marian Marsh, soprano; Howard 
Fried, tenor; Marvin Klebe, bass- 
baritone, and the Oakland Sym- 
phony Chorus (Joseph Liebling, 
director). A stunning program 
recorded in quadraphonic sound 
by George Craig. Two of the 
channels of this program will be 
broadcast over KPFA, and the 
other two over KSFX (103.7 
FM). Tune one stereo radio to us 
and the other to KSFX and enjoy 
the program. 



34 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



craonDaxj 



22 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:30 

WEEKLY MONDAY 

Charles Shere 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last Saturday's 
commentary by Henry Ander- 
son. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Satie: Parade, Trois Petite 
Pieces Montee; Rosenthal, 
French National Radio and 
Television Orchestra 
'Everest 3234 (21) 

Milhaud: Le Boeuf Sur Le 
Toit; Milhaud, Orchestre du 
Theatre des Champs-Elysees 
'Nonesuch H-7122 (15) 

Satie: La Mort de Socrate 
Monteil, soprano; Rosen- 
thal, French National 
Radio Orchestra 
'Everest 3234 (25) 

Honegger: Symphony No. 3 
(Liturgique) Ansermet, 
I'Orchestre de la Suis e 
Romande 
London CS 6616 (29) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 



11:15 

DUTCH COMPOSERS 

OF THE 

TWENTIETH CENTURY 

Berend Giltay: Concerto 
for Two Violins and 
Orchestra; Bouw Lemkes 
and Jeanne Lemkes, 
violins; Utrecht Symphony 
Orchestra, Paul Hupperts 
Radio Nederland 



11:45 

THE E.T. EARL LECTURES 
AT THE 

PACIFIC SCHOOL OF 
RELIGION 

Prof. Paul Louis Lehmann of the 
Union Theological Seminary. "New 
Testament Paradigms of Revolu- 
tionary Action." 

12:45 

A VISIT WITH 

NOEL COWARD 

A selection of Coward's songs 
and scenes from Blithe Spirit 
and Present Laughter. George 
Cleve is the host. 

1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES 

& OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last Friday's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

with George Cleve 



WHAT' 
! 5:00 



5:15 

5:30 
6:00 

6:15 
7:00 



S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 

BRITISH PRESS * 

REVIEW I 

CALENDAR OF • 

EVENTS • 

JUDICIAL REVIEW * 

COMMENTARY * 

Henry Ramsey * 

KPFA NEWS * 

SOVIET PRESS * 

& PERIODICALS • 

William Mandel * 



WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 




7:30 

AUDITION/EDITION 
With Richard Friedman 



•EAR*R*II 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Timely public affairs coverage. 

9:00 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY 

NADEZHDA ANDREIEVA 

OBUKHOVA 

To commemorate the 85th anni- 
versary of the birth of this great 
Russian mezzo-soprano, Larry 
Jackson presents the first of two 
programs this year devoted to 
her art. In addition to singing 
various arias and songs. Miss Ob- 
ukhova will chat about her ca- 
reer with translations by Larry 
Jackson. 

10:00 

WRITERS AND WRITING 

Bay Area novelists, writers and 
poets talk about their writing 
and read passages from newly 
published work. 

11:00 

THE IMPLICATIONS 

OF INDOCHINA 

Dr. Franz Schurmann discusses 
why he feels that coalition gov- 
ernments with Communists play- 
ing leading roles are the only 
feasible road to peace in Indo- 
China. Dr. Schurmann is prof, 
of sociology and history at UC 
Berkeley. This is the 2nd in a 
series of 7 programs on "The 
New Asia" sponsored by the 
World Affairs Council of Nor- 
thern California. 

12:00 

AFTERMATH 
MODULAR RESONANCE 
with John Schneider 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



35 



xiciesT>x 



*} 



13 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:45 

IN THE MORNING 

Paul Fagan 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Henry Ramsey! 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Handel: L' Allegro e il Pen- 
sieroso; Addison, 
McCollum Reardon, 
Waldman, Music Aeterna 
Decca DXS 7165 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by Zena 
Henderson, author of The People. 
The reader is Bill Cavness. 

11:15 

SOVIET PRESS & 

PERIODICALS 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram with William Mandel. 

11:45 

THE E. T. EARL LECTURES 

Professor Paul Louis Lehmann of 
the Union Theological Seminary, 
"New Testament Paradigms of 
Revolutionary Action." 

12:45 

THE RECORDED ART OF 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 

Ravel: Mother Goose Suite 

Stravinsky: Capriccio 

Ravel : Daphnis and Chloe Suite 

Prepared and produced by Larry 

Jackson. 



1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES 

& OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

CONCERT 

OF NEW RELEASES 

with George Cleve 



WHAT 

* 5:00 

* 5:15 

* 

* 5:30 



5:45 
6:00 



SHAPPENING*WHAT'S 
TO BE ANNOUNCED * 
CALENDAR OF * 

EVENTS * 

DRAMA AND * 

LITERATURE * 

REVIEW * 

TO BE ANNOUNCED * 
COMMENTARY ♦ 

David Bortin * 

KPFA NEWS * 



* 6:15 

• * 

WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 




7:00 ELWOOD'S ARCHIVES 

Cecil Taylor, as a piano soloist, 
with some quite rare ren- 
ditions. 



7:30 THE MOVIES 

Bob Sitton talks to people 
who make them about them. 



L 



•EAR*RAID* 



7:30 PM 

KPFB: LIVE BROADCAST OF 

BERKELEY CITY COUNCIL 

MEETING 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Documentaries, discussions and 
special reports. 



9:00 

BEFORE YOU TRUST 

IN CRITICS 

Stephen Kanfer, film critic for 
Time magazine, talks with Al 
Lees about the presuppositions 
of the critic. (WBAI) 

9:30 

THE JULIO ROLDAN 

CHURCH 

This is a program from Radio 
Free People concerning the oc- 
cupation of the Spanish Metho- 
dist Church in NY by the Young 
Lords on the New York Prison 
situation and their plans for the 
church. 

10:00 

DOROTHY KIRSTEN 

SPECIAL 

1970 marked 3 anniversaries in 
the operatic career of Miss Kirsten: 
the 30th year since her debut on 
the Chicago Opera stage, and the 
25th since her first appearance 
with the. San Francisco and Met- 
ropolitan Opera Companies. The 
SF Company designated its 
Nov. 28th performance as a cele- 
bration of this anniversary. Since 
Miss Kirsten has been poorly ser- 
ved by commercial recording 
companies, the program will fea- 
ture private recordings dating 
from her earliest days to per- 
formances recorded very recent- 
ly. The program concludes with 
an interview with Dorothy Kirs- 
ten. Produced for KPFA by 
Stan Farwig. 

12:00 

•INSIDE ON THE OUTSIDE 

DeLeon Harrison 



36 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



H 



24 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:45 

METAPHYSICAL 

IN THE MORNING MIX 

Jim Emdy. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by David Bortin. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Brown: Available Forms I 

Maderna, Rome Symphony 

Orchestra 

*Victrola VICS 1239(9) 
Pousseur: Rimes pour differentes 

source sonores 

Maderna, Rome Symphony 

Orchestra 

*Victrola VICS 1239(14) 
Coleman : Saints and Soldiers (20) 

Space Flight (4) 

The Chamber Symphony of 

Philadelphia Quartet 

"Victor LSC 2982 
Stockhausen: Opus 1970 

Kontarsky, piano; Fritsch, 

electric viola; Boje, electronim; 

Gahlhaar, tam-tam; Stockhau- 
sen, conductor (56) 

DGG 139 461 SLPM 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by 
Zena Henderson, author of The 
People. The reader is Bill Cavness. 

11:15 

CAN THE OCEANS BE 

DISARMED? 

The possibility of developing an 
ocean "peace system" as a first 
step to real disarmament on a 
world and national basis is dis- 
cussed in this program, which was 
excerpted from a series of con- 
ferences held to prepare the 
Pacem in Maribus Convocation 
in Malta in June-July 1 970. Spon- 
sored by the Center for the 
Study of Democratic Institutions. 



12:00 

U.C. NOON CONCERT - 

LIVE. 

Baroque Music performed by 
Robert Strizich, Bruce Haynes, 
Francesca Howe and Mary Cyr. 

1:00 

CHRISTMAS IN JAIL 

Christmas in Jail is a poem by 

Stanley Eldridge. Stanley, Ossie 

Davis and Ruby Dee discuss the 

I poem and others from Stanley's 

\ book, Return Me To My Mind. 

| (Martin Luther King Speaks) 

1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

with George Cleve. 



WHAT'S HAPPENING # WHAT'§ 

* 5:00 JAPANESE PRESS 

* REVIEW 

* 5:15 CALENDAR OF 

* EVENTS 

* 5:30 BAY AREA 

* INSTITUTE 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY 

* Cy Schoenfield 



* 6:15 KPFA NEWS 
WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 




7:00 

ODE TO GRAVITY 

With Charles Amirkhanian 

"Don't put anything on me. 



•EAK*RAID*- 



8:00 

REVOLUTIONARY HISTORY: 

A BLACK PANTHER'S VIEW 

OF AMERICA'S PAST 

Michael Tabor, one of the New 
York Panther 21, delivered a 
radical revision of American his- 
tory at the Panther's Revolution- 
ary People's Constitutional Con- 
vention last September, called to 
draft a new U.S. Constitution. 
First broadcast a few days after 
its delivery, we repeat Tabor's 
speech now in response to 
listeners' requests. (WBAI) 

10:15 

RUTA IN PROFILE 

Nelson Sullivan talks with Ken 
Ruta, ACT's versatileactor, about 
his career on the stage. 

10:45 

CPE LECTURE: 

HARRY MAGDOFF 

Mr. Magdoff, Editor of the 
Monthly Review and author of 
the book The Age of Imperialism, 
talks on the economics of the 
World Capitalist System. He gives 
special attention to the relation- 
ship between the capitalism of 
the developed countries and that 
of the developing countries. His 
speech is followed by a short 
question period. 

12:00 

MIDNIGHT COUNTRY 

With Paul Rude and Bob Kridle. 
Live and recorded backwoods 
repertoire. No commercials. 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



37 




25 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:45 

METAPHYSICAL 

IN THE MORNING MIX 

Jim Emdy. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Cy Schoenfield. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Vespers and Matins of the Eastern 

Orthodox Church 

The Russian Choir of Feodor 

Potorjinsky 

Westminster MG-138 (25) 

Henze: The Raft of the Frigate 
"Medusa" 

Moser, soprano; Fischer- 
Dieskau, baritone; Orchestra 
and Chorus of the North 
German Radio conducted 
by Hans Werner Henze 
*DGG 139 428/29(75) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

The Anything Box, an anthology 
of science fiction fantasy by 
Zena Henderson, author of The 
People. The reader is Bill Cavness. 

11:15 

DUTCH COMPOSERS OF THE 

20TH CENTURY 

Herman Strategier: Rondo 

Giocoso 

Limburg Symphony Orchestra 

Conductor: Andre Rieu 
Kees Van Baaren: Musica per 

orchestra 

Amsterdam Concertgebouw 

Orchestra; Conductor: 

Bernard Haitink 



11:45 

THE E.T. EARL LECTURES 

Professor Martin E. Marty of the 
University of Chicago, an associ- 
ate editor of The Christian 
Century, "The Moment Between 
Two World Views." 

12:45 

RICHARD RUSH, DIRECTOR 

An interview with the director of 
Getting Straight. The interviewers 
are Margo Skinner and Alan Far- 
ley. They discuss Mr. Rush's 
development as a director, as well 
as his recent film. 

1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES 

F.Y.I. 

3:00 

CONCERT OF NEW RELEASES 

With George Cleve 



WHAT'S HAPPENING # WHAT'S 

* 5:00 MUSIC REVIEW 

* Charles Amirkhanian 

* 5:15 CALENDAR OF 

* EVENTS 

* 5:30 CAVEAT EMPTOR 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY 

* Hal & Anne Draper 

* 6:15 KPFA NEWS 

WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 




7:00 

MUSIC IN AMERICA 
Chris Strachwitz 
♦EJurmAiD*..-. 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Timely public affairs coverage. 

9:00 

BIAFRA GOODBYE 

Alan Farley interviews Herbert 
Gold about his book, Biafra 
Goodbye. The book concerns the 
author's visit to Biafra in 1969 
and his actions on behalf of that 
country in the last days of the 
civil war in early 1970. 

9:30 

FESTIVAL OF FLANDERS - 

1970 

Jean Louel: Symphony for 

Strings and Orchestra 
Bela Bartok: Concerto for 

Orchestra 

Michael Gielen, Belgian 

National Orchestra 

(Belgian Radio & Television) 

10:30 

(FOR YOUNG MEN) WARNING: 

THE DRAFT MAY BE 

DANGEROUS TO YOUR 

HEALTH 



11:00 
SPECTRUM 

Using a number of commentaries 
and musical illustrations, Carlos 
Hagen explores the profound 
dichotomy he observes today be- 
tween urban and rural America 
and relates how he thinks this 
division has affected him and 
other newcomers to the United 
States. 

12:00 
AFTERMATH 

Jeff Echeverria. 



Two films starring Rudolph Valentino are featured tonight at the Pacifica Film Festival. 



38 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



p£lD2LC| 

7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 



7:45 

FRIDAY MORNING 94.1 

Denny Smithson. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Hal & Anne Draper. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Nono: Polifonica-Monodia- 

Ritmica (10) 
Maderna: Serenata No. 2(13) 
Be r i o : Differences (14) 

Maderna and Berio, 

Chamber Orchestra 

*Mainstream MS/5004 
Kelemen: Etudes Contrapuntiqes 

(11) 
Castiglioni: Tropi (9) 
Fellegara: Serenata (7) 
Yun: Music for Seven instruments 

(11) 

Travis, Hamburg Kammer- 

solisten 

'Mainstream MS/5006 
Live Electronic Music 

improvised: AMM 

Cardew, Gare, Hobbs, 

Prevost, Rowe (24) 

'Mainstream MS/5002 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

Alex Burdett reads the only 
translation available in this coun- 
try of Jacques Prevert's An 
Attempt at a Description of a 
Dinner of Heads in Paris, France. 

11:15 

FESTIVAL OF FLANDERS - 
1970 

Marti nu: Divertimento (Serenade 
No. 4) 

Gistelinck: Ad maiorem Lim- 
burgiae Fodientum Gloriam 
1970 (Homage to the Urn- 
burg Miners) 
Soloists of the Belgian 
Chamber Music Orchestra, 
conducted by George Maes 
(Belgian Radio & Television) 

KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



11:45 

E.T. EARL LECTURES 

Professor Martin E. Marty of the 
University of Chicago, an associ- 
ate editor of The Christian 
Century, "The Moment Between 
Two World Views." 

12:45 

FOUNDATIONS OF A 
REPERTORY THEATER 

Sir Tyrone Guthrie talks about 
his theater and the differences 
between New York and regional 
productions. 



1:45 

NEWS HEADLINES 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

With George Cleve. 



WHAT'S 
* 5:00 



5:15 



5:30 



5:45 



6:00 



6:15 



HAPPENING*WHAT'S 
ON FILM I 

Bob Sitton 
CALENDAR OF 
EVENTS 
SCIENCE & 
ENGINEERING 
REVIEW 
Marve Hyman 
REPORT TO THE 
LISTENER 
Al Silbowitz 

COMMENTARY 
Bruce Franklin 
KPFA NEWS 



26 




7:00 SOUNDS OF AFRICA 
With KPFA's Sam Oni. 



•EAR-HAID*- 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Documentaries, discussions and 
special reports. 

9:00 

ON STAGE 

The Importance of Being Ernest 
by Oscar Wilde. With Gladys 
Cooper, Joan Greenwood, Alec 
McCowen, Richard Johnson and 
Lynn Redgrave. Directed by 
Peter Wood. 



10:45 

VIENNA FESTIVAL 1970 

Beethoven : Symphony No. 4 in 
B-flat, op. 70 

Beethoven: Symphony No. 7 in 
A, op. 92 

von Karajan; Berlin Philhar- 
monic 
(Austrian Radio) 

12:00 

•INFORMATION 

TRANSMISSION 

MODULATION AND 

NOISE 

Richard Friedman. 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 




KPFA Christmas Fair - 1970 



39 



sxc 



cirDao 



27 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

8:45 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Bruce Franklin. 

9:00 

MORNING CONCERT 

Hindemith: Cardillac 

Fischer-Dieskau, Kirschstein, 
Grobe, Kohn, Keilberth; 
Chorus and Orchestra of the 
Cologne Radio 
DGG 139 435/36 (90) 



11:00 

CHILDREN'S BOOK SAMPLER 

Ellyn Beatty. 

11:15 

RAPE AT BLACK MESA 

A report on the W.E.S.T. plan to 
turn the Hopi and Navajo Re- 
servations into smog-bound sub- 
urbs of Los Angeles and destroy 
the last vestiges of the ancient 
ways of life of the Indians. 
Includes an extended interview 
conducted by Mitchell Harding 
with David Monongye, elder of 
the Hopi Nation. A report of 
objective fury. Listen! (KPFK) 

12:30 

BOOKS 

With Kenneth Rexroth. 

1:00 

MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S 

PEOPLE 

"Music of India" 



1:30 

PUBLIC LANDS: ONE-THIRD 

OF A NATION Panel No. 4 

This is the fourth in a series of 
panels at the Western Regional 
Conference on the Report of the 
Public Land Law Commission, 
held at the St. Francis Hotel in 
San Francisco on Dec. 7 and 8, 
1970. This panel deals with the 
political pressures and processes 
involved in developing public 
land law and policy. The main 
speaker, Lynton Caldwell, Poli- 
tical Scientist from the University 
of Indiana. Panel members are 
Luther Carter of Science Maga- 
zine, George Craig of the Western 
Lumber Manufacturers, Michael 
McCloskey of the Sierra Club, 
and Geoffrey Wandesforde-Smith 
of U.C. Davis. The moderator is 
Grant McConnell, Professor of 
Politics at U.C. Santa Cruz. 

3:15 

PICASSO'S MISTRESS 

Francois Gilot, author of Life 
With Picasso, is interviewed in her 
Paris studio by Ruth Beaumel. 
(KPFA Archives) 

3:30 
THIN AIR 

A program highlighting cultural 
events in the Bay Area and pre- 
senting a variety of artists who 
visit the KPFA studios. 

4:30 

GOLDEN VOICES 

With Anthony Boucher. 



5:00 

HANS HOFFMAN LECTURE 

Harold Rosenberg, art critic, dis- 
cusses the influence Hans Hoff- 
man has had on American art. 
Recorded at the opening of the 
University of California Art Mus- 
eum. 

WHAT'S HAPPENING # WHAT'S 



6:00 COMMENTARY 

Steve Murdock 
6:30 KPFA NEWS 



7:00 

LIVE CONCERT BY THE 

PACIFICA CHAMBER 

PLAYERS 

Trios for two clarinets and 
bassoon, including Three Diver- 
timenti by Mozart, Three Dances 
for two clarinets, bassoon and 
percussion by Robert Hughes, 
Music for the Changing of the 
Guard by Handel, Sonata for two 
Clarinets by Francis Poulenc, and 
other works. 

Tom Rose, clarinet and musical 

director 
Lawrence Nobori, clarinet 
Robert Hughes, bassoon 
Presented live, and in stereo 
from the KPFA studios. 



40 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



9:00 

A BUSINESSMAN'S VIEW OF 

ASIA IN THE SEVENTIES 

Charles W. Robinson, who is 
President and General Manager 
of Marcona Corporation, speaks 
on the above topic, with special 
emphasis on Japan, at a forum 
sponsored by the Asia Founda- 
tion and the World Affairs 
Council on December 8, 1970. 
Mr. Robinson has been active 
internationally in Latin America, 
New Zealand and East Asia. He 
was recently named Chairman of 
the United States National Com- 
mittee of the Pacific Basin 
Economic Cooperation Council, 
and he is also a trustee of the 
World Affairs Council. 
10:00 

BENNETT TARSHISH 
PRESENTS FRANZ 
SCHMIDT -III 

We hear more music by this 
neglected Austrian composer who 
lived 1874-1937. 
Clarinet Quintet in B (1932) 

Prinz, clarinet; Demus, piano; 

Vienna Konzerthaus Quartet 

members (stereo) 
Symphony 'No. 4 in C (1933) 

Moralt, Vienna Symphony 

12:00 
AFTERMATH 

All night jazz with Bert Thomas. 

KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 




28 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

8:30 

MORNING CONCERT 

Great Recordings of the Century 

(Part 2) 

Schubert: Moments Musicaux 
D. 780 

Artur Schnabel, piano 
Seraphim IC - 6045 (25) 

Faure: Piano Quartet No. 2 in 
G minor, Op. 45 
Jacques Thibaud, violin; 
Maurice Vieux, viola; Pierre 
Fournier, cello; Marguerite 
Long, piano 
Seraphim IC-6045 (34) 

Rachmanninov: Piano Concerto 
No. 3 in D minor, Op. 30 
Vladimir Horowitz, piano 
Coates, London Symphony 
Seraphim 60063 (34) 

10:00 

THEWAYLESSWAY: 
A MEDITATION BEING 
WITH JACK GARISS 

11:00 

JAZZ, BLUES AND 

PHILELWOOD 

1:00 

JIM FORREST OF THE 

MILWAUKEE FOURTEEN 

Bob Ortiz interviews Jim Forrest, 
who discusses his political and 
personal credo. 



2:00 

THE LONG RUSSIAN WINTER 

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov: The 

Maid of Pskov 
Olga: E. Shumilova 
Styosha: Natalya Sokolova 
Tokmanov: Nikolai Shchegolkov 
Matuta: Aleksandr Peregudov 
Mikhailo Tucha: Giorgi Nelepp 
Ivan The Terrible: Aleksandr 

Pirogov 
Vyazemsky: M. Solovyov 
Bolshoi Theatre Chorus and 
Orchestra, S. Sakharov 
Prepared and produced by Larry 
Jackson. 

WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 

* * 

* 
* 



* 5:30 VIEWS 8t REVIEWS 

* 6:30 KPFA NEWS 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 
7:00 

LEE STRASBERG AND THE 
NEW YORK ACTOR'S STUDIO 
Part III 

Focusing on the Director's Unit 
of the studio, Lee Strasberg dis- 
cusses with members of the unit 
a scene prepared by one of the 
directors. (3rd of three programs) 
8:45 

FESTIVAL OF FLANDERS - 
1970 
Frederic de Vresse: Divertimenti 

for Strings 

Belgian Chamber Music Orches 

Orchestra, conducted by 

George Maes 

(Belgian Radio & Television) 




9:00 

SUNDAY NIGHT 
DOCUMENTARY: The Visit; 
Or, Kys To The City 

Being a program about the 
appearance of the Vice President 
of South Vietnam, Nguyen Cao 
Ky, before 1000 members of the 
Commonwealth Club of San 
Francisco, on December 1, 1970. 
Including material recorded out- 
side at the demonstration called 
to protest the visit that was 
attended by at least 5000 persons 
and culminated in confrontations 
with the police leading to the 
arrest of more than 30 persons, 
mostly on charges of assault. 
Produced by KPFA's Public 
Affairs Department from the on- 
the-scene reports of Denny Smith- 
son, Hal Levin, Dan Barki, and 
Kirk Smith. (By the way, that 
evening Mr. and Mrs. Ky dined 
with Governor and Mrs. Reagan 
in Sacramento. And the workmen 
at the hotel where Mr. Ky spoke 
put up Christmas tree lights on 
the trees in front of the hotel 
during the demonstration. And 
so it goes.) 

10:00 

STAYS FRESH FOUR WAYS 

This four-channel program will 
include a tape of the Joy of 
Cooking made recently at Pepper- 
land in San Rafael. Two of the 
channels of this program will be 
broadcast over KPFA, and the 
other two over KSFX (103.7 
FM). Tune one stereo radio to us, 
and the other to KSFX and enjoy 
the programs. 



Vladimir Horowitz 



41 



CLASSIFIED 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 



CLASSIFIED AD copy should be re- 
ceived the first of the month for pub- 
lication in the following month's 
Folio. Ad rate is .40 per word, payable 
in advance (phone number counts as 
one word). Clearly state the number 
of months ad should run. Send to: 
Classified Ads, KPFA, 2207 Shattuck 
Ave., Berkeley, Ca. 94704. 



PROPERTIES 



HOME AND INVESTMENTS: KPFA 
spoken here. To buy or sell (a home, 
lot or income property), tune in with 
us. Tepping Realty Co., Berkeley, 
TH 3-5353. 
(426-0) 

READY TO SELL? Why not list with 
an active inter-racial office that be- 
lieves in integrated neighborhoods. 
Call and let's talk. Central Realty 
Service. Arlene Slaughter, Realtor. 
OL 8-2177. TH 9-2976 evenings. 
(673-0) 

KPFA Music Director still needs help. 
Charles and wife desire 2 bedroom 
house in surrounding area. Can afford 
max. $140/mo. Any leads appreciated. 
Call 848-6767. 

ANOTHER AGRARIAN LEAGUE 
cabin in Mendocino County. On the 
Eel River. One Bedroom with fireplace 
garage, woodshed. Furnished. $9,800. 
Terms. (707) 485-8198. 



INSTRUCTION 



CLASSICAL Guitar and Lute Lessons, 
Robert Strizich. 849-1870. 

GUITAR - PIANO - FLUTE - BANJO 
DRUMS - Expertly taught. Studios. 
Tupper & Reed, 841-1832. Rentals 
available. 

ZEN WORKSHOP IN Folk Guitar for 
beginners. 4 weekly sessions. Call 
Ellen, 549-1909. 

PIANO LESSONS: Julliard Graduate, 
10 years experience, enjoys children. 
Karin McPhail, 525-2594. 



HI-FI & SOUND 



EMPLOYMENT WANTED 



GRAPHIC ARTIST - design, layout, 
paste-ups, mechanicals. Experienced, 
fast, reasonable rates. 534-6041. 



FOR SALE 



DOUBLE-MANUAL concert harpsi 
chord. Lignell 1967. Rent ($40/ 
month) or sale ($3800 or best offer) 
849-1870. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



RECORDING: Non-profit sound re 
cording by appointment. Westminster 
Audio Service, 1414 8th St., Berkeley, 
Ca., LA 4-6842 after 2 PM. (679-0 v 

DAVID HAIGHT, audio consultant. 
Guaranteed service, installation, sales, 
audio equipment. Registered electro- 
nic repair dealer No. 9446. San 
Francisco 285-3074, by appointment 
(.405-0) 

FISHETI STEREO RECEIVER, Shure 
Dynetic Arm, Fairchild Turntable, 
Excellent. 931-7594. 



SERVICES 



SCHOOLS 



SAILING CLUB (like Flying Club). 
Two CAL-20's in Berkeley (fraction 
of cost of own boat). MEETING: 
Feb. 19, El Cerrito Co-Op. 368-8431 
(Redwood City). 

J. KRISHNAMURTI. For information 
on his speaking schedules, writings, 
and recordings, write to Krishnamurti 
Foundation of America, P.O. Box 216, 
Ojai, Calif. 93023. Telephone (805) 
646-2726. 



Have the public schools let your 
children down? Try THE MUJJI UBU 
SCHOOL. Call 527-1816or 841-8505. 

HAVE YOU SEEN THE "NEW" 
Berkwood School? Come for a visit. 
Openings for children 4Vi through 12. 
Before and after school care available. 
1809 Bancroft Way. 843-5724. 

WALDEN CENTER SCHOOL in 
Berkeley, rich in resources of teachers, 
materials and experiences, offering 
choices for children in an atmosphere 
of constructive freedom, will have 
some openings second semester for 
five to twelve year olds. Please call 
THornwall 1-7248. 

SAN FRANCISCO Museum of Art 
Classes: Preschool to teenage, adults 
in art and dance. Begin Feb. 16. Call 
863-8800 for brochure. 



CARPENTER - First class work, 
reasonable. Remodeling, additions and 
repairs. Kitchens, bathrooms, family 
rooms, garages, carports, decks, patios. 
San Anselmo 453-1821 (536-0) 

HOUSEPAINTING - inside and out. 
Wallpapering and tile work. 
LA 6-1805. (641-0) 
C.J. HUGHES CO. - Remodeling 
specialists. Thoughtful planning, ex- 
pert workmanship, room additions. 
Kitchens, bathrooms, decks. 848-7342 
(2451-0) 

PAINTING, light carpentry, repair 
work. 534-6041. 

INCOME TAX SERVICE, Experien- 
ced, reasonable fees. Advice on tax 
savings and shelters. Evenings, call 
474-4860. 



MOVERS 



PARK-TILDEN MOVERS. Thought- 
ful, professional service with minimum 
legal rates. 549-1762. 



MAGAZINES 



WHAT DO YOU KNOW about 
Westcoast art, photography? See 
ARTWEEK weekly. Concise, pro- 
fessional, timely. Subscribe, $5 per 
year, P.O. Box 2444, Castro Valley, 
CA 94546. 



HANDCRAFTS 



ORGANIZATIONS 



FELLOWSHIP OF HUMANITY 
Challenging programs, provocative, 
stimulating. 411 - 28th St., Oakland, 
Sunday, 11 AM. All invited. (636-0) 

ROSICRUCIANS Write for free book- 
let, 'The Mastery of Life, " Rosicrucian 
Park, San Jose, Ca. 95114 (0) 



STAINED GLASS: Design, repair, 
instruction and supplies. Leaded 
windows made to order. Mollica 
Stained Glass, 1940 - A Bonita, 
849-1591. 

SANDALS UNLIMITED - Quality 
leather goods custom made. 1951 
Shattuck Ave., Berkeley, 845-6216. 

HANDWOVENS & SANDALS. The 
Sandal Shop, 900 North Point St., 
San Francisco. 

PICTURE FRAMES. The Artisans. 
Custom Framing, 1964 Union St., 
S.F., WA 1-0456. (2304-0) 

HANDCRAFT FROM EUROPE 
Sausalito 332-1633 

No. 1 at Village Fair 
No. 2 1210 Bridgeway. Braids-Buttons 
No. 3 1201 Bridgeway. Needleworks 



RESTAURANT 



THE QUEST for gourmet dinners at 
$3.50. From 5:30, Wednesday through 
Sunday, at 1974 Shattuck, 849-0706. 



IN THE FEBRUARY ISSUE: 

• Daniel Berrigan — "No Bars to Manhood" Reviewed 

• People's Lobby Again: Zeroing in on Nuclear Power Plants 

• Welfare and Medi-Cal Problems 

• The Baldwin Channel: Boon or Boondoggle 9 

• How Richmond Gets that Way (or, Life in a Company Town) 

• Poems of Zel Latner 

• Plus Dick Gregory, Lucie Hupp, Father Riga, Dr. Tom Brewer, 
Emile, Bill Smith, Dorothy Bryant, Doris Ribera, and many others. 

Mail $3.50 for 12 issues to P.O. Box 1087, Richmond, Ca. 94802 



TREAT YOUR VALENTINE 
TO A MINI-VACATION 
at 
GREENWOOD LODGE 
In the Santa Cruz Mountains 

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY 
WEEKEND 
and Lincoln's Birthday 
and Valentine's Day 
FEBRUARY 12- 15 

(Note: Washington's Birthday 
is now celebratedon the 3rd 
Monday in February.) 

EASTER AND PASSOVER 

WEEKEND 

APRIL8-11 
featuring a traditional 
Passover Dinner 

l*SPECIAL HOLIDAY BONUS* 
$1 5% discount to all former 
Greenwood Lodge Guests! 
For rates and reservations: 
Write P.O. Box 828, Soquel, Calif. 
Or call GReenwood 5-9995 
or 9552 (408) 




HARPSICHORD 

and Early Pianoforte 
restoration, repairs 

1095 VALLEY FORK DRIVE 
SUNNYVALE, CALIF. 94087 

Phone: 415 968 4132 Agent for new and used harpsichords 



Siamf-accrecW 



43 



Media Monitor 
Continued from p. 7 



not be seen when that study was broadcast 
(if it ever was broadcast). Coincidentally, at 
an elaborate press conference, the Mobil Oil 
Corporation announced "... the largest 
single financial commitment ever made by a 
business corporation to non-commercial tele- 
vision." It was $1,000,000 to PTV for the 
coproduction of drama with the BBC and for 
promotion of Sesame Street. The dramatic 
series. Masterpiece Theater, began its local 
run on Channel 9 last month. Variety 
reported all of this, including the web of 
relationships among WGBH, the producing 
station of the Nader series, the Mobil Oil 
Corporation, PBS and an executive of WGBH. 
This public exposure may just have been the 
reason that, when the segment on deceptive 
advertising was shown (and it was), the Mobil 
spot was there. (The focus was on the phrase, 
"A cleaner engine can mean cleaner air." But 
does it?) In fact, this was the hardest-hitting 
program in the series (now defunct; it was 
set only for a limited run) and a good 
example of the kind of investigative work 
that should be done regularly on television by 
PTV and the commercial networks, but it is 
becoming less and less frequent. 

Finally, Bill Greely writes in the Novem- 
ber 18 Variety that after the hassles created 
by Banks and the Poor, another strong PTV 
documentary this last Fall, one production 
source at PBS says that "... there's every 
indication that PBS is going to be definitely 
more cautious than NET." (PBS is the succe- 
ssor organization to NET.) The producer of 
Banks and the Poor, Morton Silverstein, 
appeared on a discussion program in New 
York, and is reported by Variety to feel that 
while in commercial television you can't bite 
the hand that feeds you (the sponsor), public 
television may face a somewhat analogous 
danger from the system of Congressionally 
funded (through CPB) programming. He said 
that if the Ford Foundation should ultimately 
phase out its support, PTV's funding may be 
left in the hands of Congressional committees. 
He wondered what would happen "when for 
us the sponsor becomes the Congress and not 
any corporation." 

Miscellany: The program I mentioned last 
month, concerning Vincent Wasilewski of the 
National Association of Broadcasters, will be 
heard on Monday, February 8, at 11:15 AM. 
The views of Vice President Spiro Agnew and 
CBS News President Richard S. Salant on the 
government and broadcast journalism can be 
heard at 11:00 PM on Friday, February 12. 
Comedian-cum-social satirist George Carlin, who 
was fired from an engagement in Las Vegas for 
using the word "shit" in his act, can be heard in 
an interview discussing this and other aspects of 
his career on Thursday, February 11, at 9:00 
PM. 



Muse Aghast 
Continued from p. 7 



daily available. In addition, catalogues of 
radio performance transcriptions (i.e. NBC 
Symphony, etc.) from the thirties, forties, 
fifties, and so on would make qreat hallucino- 
genic reading matter from collectors. What- 
ever happened to that remarkable plan to 
house all extant recordings of classical music 
in a library-bank in Wisconsin with music- 
feed connections to subscribers' home sound 
systems? Then we could dial any conceivable 
selections and performance at will, thereby 
eliminating the burden, expense and mystique 
associated with the collecting of recorded 
music. 
Songs of Charles Ives 

Del Grande, baritone; Pleshakov, piano. 
*Orion Custom CST 106 

Although by now it is impossible to keep 
accurate score of the considerable corpus of 
Ives songs on records, here is an album, 
privately issued, which presents a number of 
first recordings in sensitive performances by 
Bay Area performers Peter Del Grande and 
Vladimir Pleshakov. Included are complete 
texts of the twenty-three songs on the album 
and some interesting notes by Lou Harrison, 
who was a good friend of Ives. Available 
from Mr. Del Grande, 16041 Cambrian 
Drive, San Leandro CA 94578. 

BANQUET BED 

Wade Stevenson 

After being devoured by the pollutions, 
the survival struggle of the great city, 
let the sheets open at night like jaws 
and eat you! Let your body become the food 
of the soft, smooth, white bed machine. 
Beneath your ears the pillows will purr. 
How has the funny, feline bed survived 
in such a wild zoo city that shouts 
every day, "Impose yourself or die!" 
But the bed whispers, "Yield to me 
and live!" Come and fish for your lost 
nostalgia in the trout streams of the sheets. 
The streets of the great city stir 
with starving phantoms but the bed 
is like a huge stove, cooking the raw 
nudities of all the stretched out, subdued 
bodies, marinating them with dreams, making 
them tender again for life, when they awake 
in the morning from the banquet of the bed 
where love was the feast and go walking 
amid the lean spires of the terrible city, 
the hardness, the glass and the glitter. 

Wade Stevenson, author of Beds (McCall 
Publishing Co., 1970) discusses his work 
with Bob Sitton, and reads his poetry, on 
February 4th at 1:45 PM. 

KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 




Let us take the 
weight off your 
shoulders with 
quality light- 
weight backpacking 
gear from the 
SKI HUT. 
write for catalog 

the ski hut 

1615 university ave. 

Berkeley, calif. 

94703 




I 



E QU I PM1ENT 

for Everyone Who Cooks 



KITCHEN 

1115 ShattllckAvmilt-^ PfunW 5-18-2648 

"Berkeley <wio4 Open Tues-Sat, 10 s-3o 



1 



FINE LETTERING 


CxIliairxpKv; 


l-)OD /Steiner 

1962 Uvwersitv (T^ve. \ 


Kerkclev?. Cx.94704 


$*?-+9J2 




Imported coffees 
Roasted in our own store 
Special Blended Teas 
Herbs and Spices 
Whole and Ground 
Mail Orders 
Promptly Filled. 
1 block above Shattuck 
2124 Vine Street 
Berkeley, Calif. 
Tel. 841-0564 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



45 



Manager's Report 
Continued from p. 2 



Richard S. Salant 
Continued from p. 9 



While most of Pacifica's growth has been due 
to the vitality of its conception, part has also 
been the result of changes which effect all 
educational broadcasters. FM is no longer 
a ghetto or reservation keeping the pariah from 
too much contact with the public. As the TV 
flood began to ebb, FM continued its slow climb 
to an important position in mass media. Because 
it was a commercial afterthought, it became the 
place for experimentation at low cost in broad- 
casting. Hence, phenomena such as "under- 
ground" stations. Because sound reproduction 
could be accomplished so much better on FM, 
it became the logical area for technical innova- 
tion, audience education, and growth. Today 
FM "market penetration" in most metropolitan 
areas is between 60% and 80% (percentage of 
homes owning FM receivers). 

In short, the Indians on this particular re- 
servation struck oil. Where before there were 
thousands of listeners, today there are millions. 
At the same time, sources of substantial funds- 
began to become available to educational TV 
broadcasters. The Ford Foundation, for ex- 
ample, under the leadership of Ed Murrow's 
colleague Fred Friendly and others, recognized 
a great national resource in non-commercial 
broadcasting, particularly in TV, and began to 
pour on the funds. They also counseled direct 
competition with the rulers of the media 
marketplace, the commercial networks. 

What next? More in a month. 



HOME MUSIC SYSTEMS 

DEMONSTRATIONS, INSTALLATIONS, 
SERVICE, STOCK & CUSTOM CABINETRY 

klipsch, Mcintosh, fisher, etc. 

BERKELEY CUSTOM 
ELECTRONICS 

2302 ROOSEVELT, BERKELEY 
843-4180 12-6Tues.-Fri. 

10-6Saty., andThurs. Eve. to 9p.m. 



HARPSICHORD 
Building and Repair 

By the maker of the KPFA Harpsichord 
Small instruments a speciality 
Zuckerman voicing, regulating, etc. 

Jon Bokelman 
2332 Cedar 
Berkeley 
841-9644 



But we must remember that this is exactly 
what the First Amendment is about: It was not 
designed to protect the press from saying 
things with which we, or the majority of people, 
agree. It was designed to prevent government 
intrusion against outrageous and disagreeable 
statements with which we totally disagree. Its 
spirit is, and our spirit must be, the spirit of 
Voltaire, who said, "I disapprove of what you 
say, but I will defend to the death your right to 
say it." 

. . . Third, we must face up once and for all 
to this problem of freedom of electronic journal- 
ism which is part of a business subject to 
pervasive regulation and licensing, and, then we 
must seek, imaginatively, creatively, systemati- 
cally, to find the way to reconcile to the 
maximum extent possible the irreconcilables of 
freedom and licensing. 

What I suggest, in short, is that it is time to 
dig beneath the assumptions, the slogans, the 
surface logic — and reexamine not only the con- 
stitutional and legal bases, but the policy bases 
of government regulation of electronic journal- 
ism. 

Were it not for the current — and unfortunate 
— attitudes toward Presidential Commissions, I 
would urgently propose that this issue is so 
important to the American people, to the Con- 
stitution, to the viability of our democracy and 
the press, that a Presidential Commission be 
established to study it and make recommenda- 
tions. For it is an immense job and not a simple 
one. It will call for systematic and dispassionate 
study and innovative solutions. But it must be 
done if we take our journalistic functions and 
our obligations to America seriously. Somehow, 
a way must be found to disentangle broadcast 
journalism, on the one hand, and licensing, on 
the other hand. And the way must be found 
soon — before it is too late. 

And I suggest that whoever reexamines these 
critical issues would do well to keep in mind the 
wise words of J. Edward Murray, managing 
editor of The Arizona Republic — a newspaper 
notable for its sharp criticism of network news 
and particularly CBS News — early this year 
when Mr. Murray received the John Peter 
Zanger award: 

The record of the press is pockmarked 
with editors' mistakes. And there may 
be American publishers who think 
freedom of the press belongs to the 
man who owns one. 
The whole point, however, is that the 
editor, fallible as he is, can still do his 
job better than anyone else in a free 
society. And he cannot be compelled 
by judges, lawyers, policemen or 
politicians without doing more damage 
than good. 

I can only say, "Amen." ***»»#*** 



UP your 
down pleasure 

with BugaBOO 
sleeping bags— 

$64 ■ $87 




MT, 

mountain 
traders 



171 1 Grove (Walk Up the Driveway) 

Berkeley • 845-8600 

Mon-Fri 12-7* Sat 9-3 




an unusual conference center 
in the Santa Cruz mountains 

Serenity in a sylvan setting for 
work and relaxation. Deluxe all- 
year, all-weather accommodations 
located in a secluded mountain 
meadow on 160 tree-filled acres. 
No smog, noise or neighbors. 
Beautiful conference rooms, great 
hospitality for 8 to 30 guests 
American plan. Just one hour 
away. For free colorful brochure 
write: Satori, Route 1, Box 521, 
Boulder Creek, CA 95006. 



4 



BAY AREA FUNERAL SOCIETY 

P.O. BOX 264 
BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 
841-6653 

and 

PENINSULA FUNERAL SOCIETY 
168 SO. CALIFORNIA AVE. 
PALO ALTO, 94306 
321-2109 

non-profit cooperatives 

providing families with a choice 

of simple, lowcost 

minimal funerals. 

A direct challenge 

to the high cost of dying 

in America 



BACK TO THE LAND 
IN MENDOCINO COUNTY 

Ecology-minded community 

has land and homesteads. 

10 - 160 acre sections. 

$350 - $650 per acre. Terms. 

$750 down, $65 per month 

on 10 acres. 

Apply: 

California Agrarian League 
(707) 263-6402 




'_ 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



47 



[Film Festival — Continued] 

Of the heroes and heroines who graced the 
silent screen, perhaps the most versatile were 
Lillian Gish and Richa/d Barthelmess. Miss Gish 
has become a legend in her own time. Her per- 
formances ranged from the little sister in 
Griffith's Orphans of the Storm to the hard- 
bitten old lady of Laughton's Night of the 
Hunter. Barthelmess as well has essayed the 
romantic and the realistic, from the shy China- 
man of Broken Blossoms to the militant 
American Indian in Alan Crosland's Massacre. 
On April 1st, the Pacifica Film Festival will 
present an evening with these two stars in two of 
their most memorable performances, both 
under the direction of D.W. Griffith. Way Down 
East, Griffith's last major film, is a story of 
loneliness and injustice starring Miss Gish as an 
unwed mother sent out in the storm. The ice 
floe scene, filmed on the Griffith estate at 
Mamoroneck, N.Y., is still a high point in 
melodramatic moviemaking. Staged so realistic- 
ally that it nearly caused the death of the young 
actress, this scene and the film in general pro- 
vide a fascinating contrast to the misty 
impressionism of Broken Blossoms. In this later 
film, Griffith answered those who said that his 
true genius lay in realism by producing a gentle 
and sensitive story of love across racial lines. 
Broken Blossoms with its gauzy, lyrical photo- 
graphy is as beautiful as a moving daugerrotype. 




Two others were paired so well on the screen 
were Boyer and Bergman, perhaps never so well 
as in Gaslight. Who could forget Charles Boyer 
as the evil husband trying to drive his wife 
insane through nightly visits to the attic pre- 
ceded by the mysterious lowering of the gas 
lights? Ingrid Bergman was never more vulnerable 
than as the trusting, tormented wife driven to 
the brink of madness by the man she loved. 
Taken from Patrick Hamilton's stage thriller. 
Angel Street, the film is directed with a flair for 
Victorian atmosphere by George Cukor. It will 
be shown in the Pacifica Film Festival on 
April 8. 

For a change of mood, perhaps needed after 
a chilly thriller, two silent melodramas and a 
trip to the moon, the Festival turns to the 
48 



American musical comedy on April 15 with the 
contrasting styles of Busby Berkeley and Fred 
Astaire. The Depression would have been 
thoroughly unbearable had it not been for the 
leggy, dazzling musicals of Busby Berkeley. 
"Boom Buzz, they used to call me," he said 
once, at a tribute to his work in New York. "I 
was always on the boom." Berkeley took the 
crane shot, introduced by Paul Fejos in the first 
supermusical, Broadway (1929) and made it his 
trademark. His camera virtually never rested, 
floating over fields of sequined ladies dancing 
atop rows of white pianos, diving underwater to 
film Berkeley's personally favorite scene, the 
waterfall sequence from Footlight Parade, and 
scanning the Manhattan rooftops in his memor- 




42nd Street 
able adaigo sequence from 42nd Street. This 
latter film, so typical of Berkeley's work, will be 
shown with Top Hat, starring the incomparable 
Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. Fred Astaire 
rightly chose a different style of film to 
demonstrate his talent. No crane shots for him. 
He called for a stable camera. Just the dancing 
and the music and the wit and grace of the 
Astaire-Rogers team, a perfect combination if 
ever there was one. In Top Hat, which they did 
in 1935, their own talents were spiced by a 
supporting cast that included Edward Everett 
Horton, Eric Blore and Helen Broderick. Mark 
Sandrich directed what is perhaps the greatest 
dance number ever filmed, the title sequence per- 
formed with unbelievable facility by Astaire. 
Add to these the Irving Berlin score, with such 
favorites as "Isn't It A Lovely Day?," "Cheek to 
Cheek" and "The Piccolino" and we have a 
perfect musical that compares most interestingly 
with the films of Busby Berkeley. 

These ten programs make up the first half of 
the Pacifica Film Festival, which we hope you 
will agree provides a most varied aricl exciting 
season. The complete program is listed on the 
poster enclosed in this issue of the Folio. There 
will be further notes on the films in our March 
issue. Meanwhile, you are invited to use the 
enclosed membership card which as a subscriber 
to KPFA entitles you to admission to the 
Festival at a reduced cost. Come and enjoy. 

KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



JLl Lit 



/£ Hint MowiAmts to wl community, 

k£ OFFE& y<HJ 4 BEAtWWL W VflTIf 
ZEUXEP PBOPL& TO ff£LP J0# /A/ WL 

seuanoM of- oAlifomia amp impw*o 
WM£S, As Heu. AS IMroxJtD Utx&. 

We- mite. y<w to kztvmM yoitK. EMrry 
Bonus to us hk &</se AC RBCfCUM*. 



Hmyi*4mn***i, 



***i3t- 






':■' :?.'s ■' 



xk&L*fot. 



*r rested W Hottrv &B&ELay 
GZ7-aAoo to Jul — toir*\.oiuy 



k- i. i. i- 



THE 



AUDIO CLINIC 

>\U0/O - ELECTRONIC 
SALES and SERVICE 

PERSONAL ATTENTION BY 

AUDIO SPECIALISTS FOR 

YOUR SALES & SERVICE NEEDS 

2985 COLLEGE AVENUE 

BERKELEY, CALIF. 94705 

549-0206 



WE SUPPORT 
KPFA 

ANDREWS TRAVEL 

2205 SHATTUCK 
BERKELEY 

848-3700 
CALLUS- -ANYTIME 

Member American Society of Trml-Jkftnts , 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



49 




^=^ 




help 




prisoner 
subscription/ 



the BERKELEY TRIBE currently sends over eight - hundred 
subscriptions free to prisoners, from Soledad, San Luis, San 
Quentin, to prisons all over the country. . . since the Tribe 
operates at cost, this is a terrific drain on our resources 

in order to help these POW's keep in touch with what their 
sisters and brothers are doing on the outside, we are grateful 
for any contributions to subsidize these subscriptions — 



name, 
street. 



city. 



state. 



zip. 



$8 per year 
in Amerika 

$12 elsewhere 
on earth 



$5 for six 
months 

$15 per year 
institutions 



FREE TO ALL 
PRISONERS 

send to: 
BERKELEY TRIBE 

P.O. Box 9043 
Berkeley, Calif. 94709 



oc5fi&P 






9 



m 

. ••:•:•. M*. x*. ••:•:•. ••:• 



FOODS FOR THOUGHT: 

FROM YOUR CO-OP HOME ECONOMIST 

1.60 

A new publication of selected 
handout sheets most requested 
from our Co-op shoppers 
ON SALE AT ALL OUR CENTERS 



•&'. 



&F 
Wd 



CONSUMERS CO OP Of BERKELEY 

: : : :% % %% % ¥:% % ?:%**:V' : : : :0 : :^ 




Tlie finest in Stereo Hi -Pi 
and Qustom Gabinetry 

SALES and SERVICE 843-7301 
2342 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley 94704 




Park-Tilden Movers 

1429 OREGON STREET 
BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 549-1762 

Thoughtful, professional service 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



51 



Now the artists and craftsmen whose work is shown in museum exhibits and 
written about in craft publications have retail showcases for their work in the 
tradition of the handcrafted. 



In San Francisco: 

GHIRARDELLI CRAFT GALLERY 
3rd Floor — Cocoa Building 

In Famous Ghirardelli 
Square 



In Berkeley: 

StGHT AND SOUND 
2433 Durant Avenue 
1 Block from the 
University 



POTTERY . . . METAL ETCHINGS AND SCULPTURE . . . CANDLES 
PHOTOGRAPHS . . . LITHOGRAPHS . . . STAINED GLASS . . . JEWELRY 
TRADITIONAL WORK IN WOOD, LEATHER AND STONE 
CONTEMPORARY DESIGNS IN LUCITE, PLEXIGLASS AND CHROME 
AND IN BERKELEY - ELECTRONIC GIFTS - RADIOS - TAPE 
RECORDERS - RECORDS AND TAPES AT DISCOUNT 

museum quality gifts at bargain bazaar prices 



SAN FRANCISCO 
Open Daily 10-9 
441-0780 



BERKELEY 
Open Daily 9:30 
549-1891 



October 2, 1970 

2622 Gough Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Mr. Al Silbowitz, Manager 

KPFA 

2207 Shattuck Avenue 

Berkeley, California 94704 

Dear Mr. Silbowitz: 

I have just returned from Europe on a KPFA Charter Flight and I 
want to tell you what a beautifully organized flight it was. 

Before leaving, I had talked with a number of people who had gone 
to Europe on charter flights organized by other organizations and I was 
warned to be prepared to wait four and five hours in the airport before 
taking off both in going and returning. Since I had had a long illness before 
going, I was very apprehensive about this but nothing of the sort took place. 
We took off promptly as scheduled, much to my surprise. On returning the 
same thing occurred. You have no idea what a relief it was when this happened. 
I have been telling everyone I know about this and I now want f o compliment 
you and the Andrews Travel Agency for the way these flights are being organized. 

Sincerely yours, 

Sonia Trager 



52 



KPFA FOLIO/FEBRUARY 1971 



KPFA PACIFICA 
CHARTER FLIGHTS 
TO EUROPE: 1971 



Flight 1 



Leave MAY 16 OAKLAND-AMSTERDAM 
Return JUNE 18 AMSTERDAM-OAKLAND 
Price $260 



PAYMENT DATES 

1st payment $185 per passenger, due by 
February 15, 1971 • 2nd payment $75 per 
passenger, due by February 15, 1971 Final 
payment $75 per passenger, due by April 1, 
1971 



Flight 2 

Leave JUNE 21 
Return JULY 18 
Price $298 



OAKLAND-AMSTERDAM 
AMSTERDAM-OAKLAND 



PAYMENT DATES 

1st payment $11 per passenger, due by 
February 1 5, 1 971 • 2nd payment $1 00 per 
passenger, due by March 15, 1971 • 3rd 
payment $88 per passenger, due by May 1, 
1971 



Flight 3 

Leave AUG. 31 
Return OCT. 1 
Price $260 



OAKLAND- AMSTERDAM 
AMSTERDAM-OAKLAND 



PAYMENT DATES 

1st payment $110 per passenger, due by 
March 1, 1971 • 2nd payment $75 per 
passenger, due by April 15, 1971 • 3rd 
payment $75 per passenger, due by June 1, 
1971 



AIRLINE 

Trans International Airlines ■ Super DC-8 jet 
First Class in-flight meals served ■ Comfor- 
table seating. 



ELIGIBILITY 

KPFA Pacifica subscribers for six months 
prior to flight, and members of subscriber's 
family: spouse, dependent children, and 
parents living in same household. 



Reservations are now being taken for all flights. Please use the coupon below to request detailed 
information and an application blank, or phone ANDREWS TRAVEL AGENCY (848-3700) and an 
application blank will be sent by return mail. 



TO: ANDREWS TRAVEL AGENCY/2205 SHATTUCK AVE/BERKELEY CAL 94704 

I am a Pacifica Foundation (KPFA) subscriber. 

I wish to enroll persons for flight number described above. 

Please send me an application blank and detailed information. 



Name. 



Telephone. 



Street address. 



City. 



State. 



-Zip- 



Flights are subject to filling the planes. Schedules are subject to change. 



Dated Program 

ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 



Nonprofit Org. 

U.S. Pottage 

PAID 

Berkley, Calif. 
Permit No. 219 



KPFA FOLIO 
2207 shattuck 
berkeley, calif. 
94704 



DOIT BLAME THE PEOPLE 



Here's the evidence 

to refute 

Spiro T. Agnew, 

much-needed evidence that CBS, NBC, ABC, 
The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times 
and other major news agencies are guilty of 
deliberately slanting, distorting and censoring 
the news in order to gain public support for 
establishment policies. 

The author, a history teacher, brings to light 
how the news media have manipulated attitudes 
toward the Vietnam War, pollution, population 
increase, minorities, dissenters, car safety, the 
hazards of smoking, hunger in America, 
abortion and crime— not to serve liberal causes, 
but to serve mass media's and the corporate 
establishment's own profit-making and political 
interests. For this reason the author blames the 
news media, not the people, for the mistaken 
priorities and policies that have made America 
unnecessarily pay so high a price in lives, 
resources, environmental quality and 
world-wide respect. 

Don't Blame the People contains over 300 
pages of evidence to prove that Spiro Agnew is 
off target in claiming the bias favors 
liberals— when the bias has always been, and is 
now, in favor of conservatives. 




Diversity Press 

Box 45764 

Los Angeles, Ca. 90045 

Please ship immediately copy(s) of Don't 

Blame the People. Paperback $2.95 

Please enclose payment. 

Name 

Street 

City 



.State 



Zip 



— *